Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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Astroball: The New Way to Win it All
Ben Reiter (King's 2002)

When Sports Illustrated declared on the cover of a June 2014 issue that the Houston Astros would win the World Series in 2017, people thought Ben Reiter, the article’s author, was crazy. The Astros were the worst baseball team in half a century, but they were more than just bad. They were an embarrassment, a club that didn’t even appear to be trying to win. The cover story, combined with the specificity of Reiter’s claim, met instant and nearly universal derision. But three years later, the critics were proved improbably, astonishingly wrong. How had Reiter predicted it so accurately?

The Impatient Dr. Lange One Man's Fight to End the Global HIV Epidemic
Seema Yasmin (Hughes Hall 2005)

When Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down by pro-Russian rebels in July 2014, the world wondered if a cure for HIV had fallen from the sky and disappeared among the burning debris. Seated in the plane’s business-class cabin was Joseph Lange, better known as Joep, a shrewd Dutch doctor who had revolutionized the world of HIV and AIDS and was working on a cure. Seema Yasmin (MB BChir '09) studied medicine at Cambridge on Dr. Joep Lange's advice. In this book she tells the story of a fearless man who fought relentlessly to end the epidemic.

With Honourable Intent - A Natural History of Fauna & Flora International
Tim Knight (Catharine's 1980)

With Honourable Intent is the previously untold story of an organisation that has been shaping and influencing conservation practice since its foundation in 1903. From its origins in African wildlife conservation, Fauna & Flora International (FFI) has grown into a truly global organisation, with projects in over 40 countries encompassing temperate and tropical forests, grasslands and deserts, limstone caves, wetlands and marine habitats.

'The Excursion' and Wordsworth’s Iconography
Brandon Yen (Queens' 2012)

This book considers William Wordsworth’s use of iconography in his long poem 'The Excursion'. Through the iconographical approach, the author steers a middle course between The Excursion’s two very different interpretive traditions, one focusing upon the poem’s philosophical abstraction, the other upon its touristic realism. Fresh readings are also offered of Wordsworth’s other major works, including 'The Prelude'.

Wordsworth's Gardens and Flowers: The Spirit of Paradise
Peter Dale (Selwyn 1969) and Brandon Yen (Queens' 2012)

A book that debunks the popular myth that William Wordsworth was, first and foremost, a poet of daffodils, Wordsworth's Gardens and Flowers: The Spirit of Paradise provides a vivid account of Wordsworth as a gardening poet who not only wrote about gardens and flowers but also designed - and physically worked in – his gardens.

What Works at Work: a guide for thoughtful managers
Mark O'Sullivan (Clare 1975)

Mark O'Sullivan's careful and thoughtful analysis exposes the deep flaws in management common sense and the ideas of the management gurus that sadly seem too often to drive managerial behaviour and decision-making.  His unbeatable combination of critical thinking and use of good quality research evidence about what does and doesn't work is applied to a wide range of classic management challenges producing compelling and practical advice.

This book is essential reading for any manager who wants to be a better manager.

Britanniae
Mark O'Sullivan (Clare 1975)

Britanniae is an historical novel set in Britain in the fourth century. When it opens we find a young woman holding her own running the family estate after the death of her parents, and harbouring secret ambitions for literary success. As rumours mount of political plots and of barbarian threats, she sets off through Britain beyond Hadrian's wall, on a journey on which she encounters love, a new future, and a chance of scholarly fame.

The Calais Letterbook of William Lord Hastings (1477) and Late Medieval Crisis Diplomacy 1477-1483
Edward Meek (Clare 1996)

Text and translation of important letters written by William Lord Hastings, king's lieutenant of Calais, during the first months of the international crisis that followed the death of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy, at Nancy in January 1477. A Franco-Burgundian war broke out and England wished to maintain diplomatic relations with both sides: Edward IV's sister, Margaret of York, was Charles the Bold's widow, but Edward also wished to keep the peace treaty he had concluded with Louis XI of France in 1475.

Human and Machine Consciousness
David Gamez (Trinity 1992)

Consciousness is widely perceived as one of the most fundamental, interesting and difficult problems of our time. However, we still know next to nothing about the relationship between consciousness and the brain and we can only speculate about the consciousness of animals and machines.

https://blackwells.co.uk/bookshop/product/Human-and-Machine-Consciousness-by-David-Gamez-author/9781783742981
Hugh Bicheno (Emmanuel 1966)

The first of two volumes dealing with the psychological and social undercurrents as well as the national and international political and military events of the Wars of the Roses

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