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Image (cropped) by Jessica Ruscello under CC0 1.0 licence

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, please submit your publication's details

Please note: to have your book considered for inclusion, its publication date must be either upcoming or it must have been published during the current calendar year. Unfortunately, we cannot include any details of books published prior to the current year.

Waves Across the South A New History of Revolution and Empire
Sujit Sivasundaram (Professor of World History, Director of the Centre of South Asian Studies)

This is a story of tides and coastlines, winds and waves, islands and beaches. It is also a retelling of indigenous creativity, agency, and resistance in the face of unprecedented globalization and violence. Waves Across the South shifts the  narrative of the Age of Revolutions and the origins of the British Empire; it foregrounds a vast southern zone that ranges from the Arabian Sea and southwest Indian Ocean across to the Bay of Bengal, and onward to the South Pacific and the Tasman Sea.

Greenery Journeys in Springtime
Tim Dee (Selwyn 1980)

One December, in midsummer South Africa, Tim Dee was watching swallows. They were at home there, but the same birds would soon begin journeying north to Europe, where their arrival marks the beginning of spring. Between the winter and the summer solstice in Europe, spring moves north at about the speed of swallow flight. That is also close to human walking pace.

Taking Up Space
Chelsea Kwakye (Homerton 2015), Ore Ogunbiyi (Jesus 2015)

As a minority in a predominantly white institution, taking up space is an act of resistance. Recent Cambridge grads Chelsea and Ore experienced this first-hand, and wrote Taking Up Space as a guide and a manifesto for change.

FOR BLACK GIRLS:

Understand that your journey is unique. Use this book as a guide. Our wish for you is that you read this and feel empowered, comforted and validated in every emotion you experience, or decision that you make.

FOR EVERYONE ELSE:

Not Quite Behaving
Michael Dawes (Queens' 1966)

In the “Roaring Twenties” three young ladies, Penrose, Clara and Tamora are preparing to be presented as débutantes for the London Season. There they meet Noel, Daniel and Neville (a Queens’ undergraduate). Society requires that débutantes and their families be of impeccable character and background. Will their dreams be shattered when Clara’s father befriends a night club hostess who is later found murdered, and Tamora’s mother becomes unhappy with the state of her marriage? And their own  antics may just cause a few problems.

The Faces
A A Khan (Clare 2018)

At Cambridge University, we follow the adventures of Elio Husseini who wakes up to strange goings on at night, while dealing with his tumultuous teenage years. In FantaBridge - Fantasy Cambridge - darkness is home to the spectres and phantoms of Cambridge's finest fellows, past and present, who roam the streets. When the 700th anniversary party is disrupted, and an evil plot by power-hungry people to turn the university upside down and cause havoc is discovered, Elio must race against time to save his world from ruin.

Bauble, Me and the Family Tree
Jennifer Moore (Selwyn 1994)

Noel is used to his unusual family set-up: him, Mum, super-brainy little sister Bauble, and his gay uncles (both called Mike) next door. But when Bauble spots Mum kissing Santa Claus—in August—everything Noel thought he knew about his family is turned upside-down...

Who’s the mysterious ‘F’ sending Mum romantic postcards? Why has she started taking weird photos of people in food bikinis? And, even though he’s clearly not Santa, might Dad still be alive after all?

The Pale Tiger
Michael Harrison

What is 'The Pale Tiger'? A myth? An almost forgotten sheet of A4 gathering dust in the vaults beneath Beijing? Or a ruthlessly audacious plan to wreak deadly revenge on America with breath-taking historical symmetry? From the steaming jungles of Hong Kong to the hard-edged clamour of New York and the Autumn chill of the grey streets of London, 'The Pale Tiger' is a piece of contemporary fiction that shines the light on some of the existential challenges facing the world today.

A Rainbow Palate How Chemical Dyes Changed the West's Relationship with Food
Carolyn Cobbold (Darwin 2011)

Aniline and ado dyes were the first of many novel substances that chemists began to synthesise on an industrial scale, and by the 1900s, a wave of bright coal tar dyes had begun to transform the Western world. Originally intended for textiles, the new dyes soon permeated daily life in unexpected ways, and by the time risks and uncertainties began to surface, they were being used in everything including food.  A Rainbow Palate examines how chemists in Europe and the US manoeuvered themselves to become instrumental players in new regimes of food production, regulation and quality testing.

Monologues from the Makom: Intertwined Narratives of Sexuality, Gender, Body Image, and Jewish Identity
Rivka Cohen, Naima Hirsch, Sara Rozner Lawrence, Sarah J. Ricklan (Jesus 2017), and Rebecca Zimilover, editors

The book is an anthology featuring 32 first-person narratives, exploring a wide range of themes relating to Jewish feminism. Through this book, we aim to amplify observant Jewish women’s voices in a way that they haven't been amplified before, subverting the community’s taboo against open discussion of female sexuality and related topics. Themes relating to the #MeToo movement and sexual assault emerge prominently throughout the book.

The Zoologist's Guide to the Galaxy is the story of how life really works, on Earth and in space.
Arik Kershenbaum

We are unprepared for the greatest discovery of modern science. Scientists are confident that there is alien life across the universe yet we have not moved beyond our perception of 'aliens' as Hollywood stereotypes. The time has come to abandon our fixation on alien monsters and place our expectations on solid scientific footing.

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