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Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, please submit your publication's details

Please note: to have your book considered for inclusion, its publication date must be either upcoming or it must have been published during the last 12 months. Unfortunately, we cannot include any details of books published prior to this time.

The Republic Re-engineered
N.U.M. Akramul Kabir Khan

This is a theist world view based social engineering model (of ~600,000 words). It has integrated every aspect of mankind within a unified education/nurturing system based on essential tri-wheeler bipolar human nature: subjective (intuition/faith) and objective (rational and empirical). The sublime vision is: human is neither absolutely free nor absolutely just until s/he becomes absolute (natural) slave of his/her Creator.

15-Minute STEM Book 2
Emily Hunt (Hughes Hall 2009)

15-Minute STEM Book 2 offers a stimulating selection of easy-to-resource STEM activities designed to engage and inspire young learners.

Full of engaging and practical ideas, this innovative resource builds on the success of Emily’s 15-Minute STEM and reassures teachers and parents that they don't need to be experts to deliver high-quality STEM education.

Delw y Byd. A Medieval Welsh Encyclopedia
Natalia Petrovskaia (Peterhouse 2004)

This edition presents extracts from the medieval Welsh encyclopedia Delw y Byd. A medieval Welsh translation of the first book of the Latin encyclopedia known as Imago Mundi, written by Honorius Augustodunensis in the first quarter of the twelfth century, this text is a fine example of the ties between the intellectual world of Europe and Wales in the late-twelfth/early-thirteenth centuries, when the text was translated, ties that brought across the scientific knowledge based on Roman and late antique sources.

Kitty and the Viscount
Philippa Carey

Kitty runs away from home when she is being forced to marry an unsavoury character. She finds refuge as a housemaid in Cherry Hinton where she encounters the viscount who is an alumnus of Trinity Hall. The story ends in the college chapel.

The Missing Major
Philippa Carey

Shortly after WW1, James is mugged and left for dead on the steps of a Methodist Chapel in Ipswich. Taken in by the minister and his daughter he is found to have lost his memory. He falls in love with the minister's daughter, but when his memory comes back, he realises he already has a fiancée living in Newmarket.

The story finishes in the old Heffers bookshop in Petty Cury (now replaced by the Cambridge Lion Yard shopping centre).

Understanding Kidney Diseases
Hugh Rayner (Caius 1975), Mark Thomas, David Milford

This book combines the reference material of a nephrology textbook with the everyday relevance of a clinical handbook. This second edition develops and expands upon the success of the first. All the content has been updated and entirely new chapters on acid-base disorders and stone disease have been added.

Emo: How Fans Defined a Subculture
Judith May Fathallah (Emmanuel 2005)

For many, the word “emo” calls to mind angsty teenagers, shaggy black haircuts, and skinny jeans. A popular music phenomenon in the early 2000s, emo is short for “emotional hardcore,” and refers to both a music genre and a youth scene notable for its androgynous style. Judith May Fathallah pushes beyond the stereotypes and social stigma to explore how online fandom has shaped the definition of emo, with significant implications both for millennial constructs of gender and for contemporary fan studies.

Viral BS: Medical Myths and Why We Fall for Them
Seema Yasmin (Hughes Hall 2005)

Can your zip code predict when you will die? Should you space out childhood vaccines? Does talcum powder cause cancer? Why do some doctors recommend e-cigarettes while other doctors recommend you stay away from them? Health information―and misinformation―is all around us, and it can be hard to separate the two. A long history of unethical medical experiments and medical mistakes, along with a host of celebrities spewing anti-science beliefs, has left many wary of science and the scientists who say they should be trusted.

Finding the 'Ring of Truth'
Richard Lyon (Fitzwilliam 1967) and Jean-Yves Le Lan

F/O Ernest Russell Lyon, aged just 21, was shot down in his Spitfire near Ploemeur in France in July 1944 and buried by the Germans in an unidentified grave in Guidel Cemetery.

This is the story of research by Richard Lyon, decades later, aided by local research by French civilians, to establish that the grave was indeed that of F/O Lyon, in the process changing the Standard of Proof (in existence since the end of WW1) required by the authorities for formal grave recognition from “Beyond all Reasonable Doubt” to “By Clear and Convincing Evidence”.

Sacred Music by Women Composers Volume 3: Advent to Candlemas
Series Editor: Louise Stewart; Editor: Olivia Sparkhall (Homerton 1998)

The third anthology in the Multitude of Voyces Sacred Music by Women Composers series, this book contains 26 choral pieces for Christmastide. Traditional carols and familiar texts rub shoulders with exciting, new tunes and poetry in this unique volume of music for the festive season. Featuring music composed from the sixteenth century onwards, nine composers are historical, whilst the remaining two-thirds are contemporary, bringing the number of different women composers in the Multitude of Voyces series to 63.

The Regeneration Promise: The Facts behind Stem Cell Therapies
Peter Hollands (Churchill 1983)

The Regeneration Promise is a reader-friendly guide to the world of regenerative medicine and stem cell technology. Most people have heard of stem cells but few understand what stem cells can and cannot do. The book covers the history of stem cell technology as a general introduction to the subject and then continues with a description of the many known types of stem cells and how these can potentially be used to treat disease.

The COVID-19 Cookbook
Trevor Underwood (Clare 1962)

This is a survival guide written by a 77-year-old scientist who is currently living alone in his house in Fort Lauderdale and who normally eats dinner in local restaurants every evening.

Chasing Butterflies in the Sunlight
Morenike Euba Oyenusi (Jesus 1985)

“Chasing Butterflies in the Sunlight" describes the joys and innocence of childhood experienced by Ronke, growing up in a beautiful, culturally and racially diverse world on a university campus in Nigeria.

Sidnie Manton; Letters and Diaries Expedition to the Great Barrier Reef 1928-1929
Sidnie Manton (Girton 1921)

Sidnie Manton was a woman of great determination and academic brilliance. At the age of 26 she became a member of the Great Barrier Reef Expedition. This was the first such scientific study of a coral reef anywhere in the world: an eminent and intrepid group of biologists, geographers and oceanographers examined the structure and ecology of the surrounding reef. They were based on Low Isle near Port Douglas but also sailed small boats to study nearby small islands and the mouth of the Daintree River, often sleeping on board or setting up tents.

For Her Good Estate The Life of Elizabeth De Burgh, Lady of Clare
Frances Underhill, Jennifer Ward, Margaret Smith (Clare Hall 1977), Jacqueline Tasioulas, Paul Binski, Claire Barnes (Clare 1976)

Elizabeth de Burgh showed feisty spirit in adversity and imprisonment, war and plague – and she and her friends were influential patrons of books and all arts while English craftsmanship was at its finest. Her legacy includes Clare College and Clare Hall in the University of Cambridge, and a treasure trove of records illuminating the contrasting reigns of her uncle Edward II and cousin Edward III.

Intimations Six Essays
Zadie Smith (King's 1994)

Deeply personal and powerfully moving, a short and timely series of reflective essays by one of the most clear-sighted and essential writers of our time

Ireland and the Great War A Social and Political History
Niamh Gallagher (University Lecturer in Modern British and Irish History)

On 4 August 1914 following the outbreak of European hostilities, large sections of Irish Protestants and Catholics rallied to support the British and Allied war efforts. Yet less than two years later, the Easter Rising of 1916 allegedly put a stop to the Catholic commitment in exchange for a re-emphasis on the national question.

When Peace Kills Politics International Intervention and Unending Wars in the Sudans
Sharath Srinivasan (David and Elaine Potter Lecturer in Governance and Human Rights in the Department of Politics and International Studies)

Why do war and coercion still dominate the political realm in the Sudans, over a decade since the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, and despite a litany of conflict resolution efforts? This book explains the paradoxical role of international peacemaking in the reproduction of violence and political authoritarianism in Sudan and South Sudan.

Double Lives A History of Working Motherhood in Modern Britain
Helen McCarthy (University Lecturer in Modern British History, since c. 1800)

A groundbreaking history of mothers who worked for pay that will change the way we think about gender, work and equality in modern Britain.

Waves Across the South A New History of Revolution and Empire
Sujit Sivasundaram (Professor of World History, Director of the Centre of South Asian Studies)

This is a story of tides and coastlines, winds and waves, islands and beaches. It is also a retelling of indigenous creativity, agency, and resistance in the face of unprecedented globalization and violence. Waves Across the South shifts the  narrative of the Age of Revolutions and the origins of the British Empire; it foregrounds a vast southern zone that ranges from the Arabian Sea and southwest Indian Ocean across to the Bay of Bengal, and onward to the South Pacific and the Tasman Sea.

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