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Image (cropped) by Jessica Ruscello under CC0 1.0 licence

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, please submit your publication's details.

Please note: to have your book considered for inclusion, it’s publication date must be either upcoming or it must have been published during the current calendar year. Unfortunately, we cannot include any details of books published prior to the current year.

Culture Shift: A Practical Guide to Managing Organizational Culture
Kirsty Bashforth (Catharine's 1988)

Nowadays, stakeholder consideration focuses as much on an organization's culture as it does on the bottom line – employees want to work for a company that has clear values and an engaging environment; customers and clients want to know they're supporting a worthwhile brand; and investors look to back socially responsible companies with good organizational health.

Mind Games. Determination, Doubt and Lucky Socks: an Insider's Guide to the Psychology of Elite Athletes
Annie Vernon (Downing 2001)

It's well known that to reach the top in elite sport, you need to have spent years honing and perfecting your physical ability. However this is only part of the template required to win – the other half is about mind games.

Throughout her career as one of the world's top athletes, Annie Vernon struggled with existential questions about the purpose of sport in our comfortable, first-world society: Why do we do it? What is it in our psyche that makes us push ourselves to the limit? What allows us to mentally overcome the physical pain?

The Painting
Anthony Stevens (Churchill 1969)

The Painting is a novel for anyone interested in the weird and (sometimes) wonderful world of contemporary art.

The art world is dismayed when famous British neo-conceptual artist Matt Stadleigh is found drowned in the Thames one week before the opening of his first major retrospective exhibition in London. At that opening, everyone is astonished to see his latest creation – kept a close secret till then and radically different from anything he has done before.

A painting. An oil painting. An ‘easel painting’!

Professor Maxwell's Duplicitous Demon
Brian Clegg

James Clerk Maxwell, an unassuming Victorian Scotsman, explained how we perceive colour. He uncovered the way gases behave. And, most significantly, he transformed the way physics was undertaken in his explanation of the interaction of electricity and magnetism, revealing the nature of light and laying the groundwork for everything from Einstein’s special relativity to modern electronics. And, as first Cavendish Professor, he was responsible for establishing the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge.

Pilgrims
Alexandra Strnad (Homerton 2004)

From the cobbled streets of Prague, to the rivers, and coastlines, of the Scottish Borders, Pilgrims journeys through place and time, juxtaposing the totalitarian authority over life in communist Czechoslovakia, fishing communities left without menfolk following storms in the North Sea, and love and longing against the variegated seasonal backdrop of the British Isles.

The Chinese Wine Renaissance
Janet Z Wang (Newnham 2001)

The rise and rise of Chinese wines, with a foreword by Oz Clarke.

The Chinese have been making wines since the days of the Silk Road and they have a rich, yet little known wine culture. While in the past it was largely grain wine that was consumed, China's grape wine market is worth around $18 billion a year. It produces over one billion litres annually, making it one of the largest wine producers and consumers in the world.

How to Fix Your Academic Writing Trouble: a Practical Guide
Inger Mewburn, Katherine Firth (Newnham 1997) and Shaun Lehmann

Are you confused by the feedback you get from your academic teachers and mentors?

This clear and accessible guide to decoding academic feedback will help you interpret what your lecturer or research supervisor is really trying to tell you about your writing - and show you how to fix it. We will help you master a range of techniques and strategies to take your writing to the next level and along the way you'll learn why academic text looks the way it does, and how to produce that 'authoritative scholarly voice' that everyone talks about.

The Treadmillers
Phillip Brown (St John's 1979)

Physical and mental exhaustion may seem the hallmarks of 'burnout', but teacher Jack Barker's inner turmoil suggests a deep dissatisfaction with developments in education per se. Disillusioned by his teaching career, and rejecting the bland cliché that education is a preparation for life, he feels that education should aim higher than the status quo and that it is a mission.

Commemoration in Medieval Cambridge
Edited by John Lee (Corpus 1997); Christian Steer

The people of medieval Cambridge chose to be remembered after their deaths in a variety of ways - through prayers, Masses and charitable acts, and by tomb monuments, liturgical furnishings and other gifts. The colleges of the university, alongside their educational role, arranged commemorative services for their founders, fellows and benefactors. Together with the town's parish churches and religious houses, the colleges provided intercessory services and resting places for the dead.

John of Salisbury and the Medieval Roman Renaissance
Irene O'Daly (Caius 2004)

This book is a detailed but accessible treatment of the political thought of John of Salisbury, a twelfth-century author and educationalist who rose from a modest background to become Bishop of Chartres. It shows how aspects of John's thought - such as his views on political cooperation and virtuous rulership - were inspired by the writings of Roman philosophers, notably Cicero and Seneca.

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