Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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Berber and Arabic in Siwa (Egypt)
Lameen Souag (Caius 2000)

Siwi is the easternmost Berber language, one of the few surviving representatives of the languages spoken in the eastern Sahara before the arrival of Bedouin Arab groups in the 11th century – although this apparent continuity conceals a history of migration, as this book argues based on loanwords and intra-Berber relationships.  The effects of contact upon the grammar are far more far-reaching than in better documented westerly Berber languages, extending to non-concatenative templatic morphology and some pronominal endings, as well as prominent calquing.

The Making of Social Theory: Order, Reason, and Desire (Second Edition)
Anthony Thomson (King's 1977)

The Making of Social Theory: Order, Reason, and Desire, second edition, chronicles the development of Western ideas about society, politics, and social life from the medieval period through to the rise of modern sociology in the early twentieth century. Theories are examined within a historical social context to provide understanding of the social circumstances in which various sociological ideologies arose. The first edition was published in 2006.

Glimpses Over The Edge
Alexander Treves (King's 1992)

A photobook documenting refugee stories in 12 different countries: photographed in Burma, Greece, Hong Kong, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, South Africa, South Korea, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey. The images, of refugees from a dozen countries, are accompanied by a personal account which sets the individuals’ lives into the context of a vast global problem.

'Janiform Novels' and Other Literary Essays
Cedric Watts (Pembroke 1958)

Previously published in a diversity of magazines and books, these conveniently-gathered literary discussions deal with such authors as Sophocles, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Marvell, Milton, Defoe, Richardson, Jane Austen, Conrad, Hemingway, Graham Greene, William Golding, Samuel Beckett and Chinua Achebe. Topics include covert plotting, the conceit of the conceit, the fallacies of structuralist and post-structuralist literary theory, delayed decoding, Shakespeare's scepticism, Conrad' s opposition to racism and imperialism, and Hemingway's profoundly ambiguous style.

Curiocity: In Pursuit of London
Henry Eliot (Magdalene 2004) and Matt Lloyd-Rose (Magdalene 2003)

Curiocity is a new guide to the capital that weaves the city’s stories together with practical ideas and itineraries. Londonist called it ‘the greatest book about London published in modern times’ and Philip Pullman described it as ‘the most ingenious, insightful, inspiring, intoxicating, and simply interesting guide to the great city that I have ever seen.’ It has 26 large maps drawn by artists including the children’s laureate Chris Riddell and the graphic novelist Isabel Greenberg.

Generation Cherry
Tim Drake (Caius 1963)

In the UK, life expectancy has increased dramatically in the last century, and with it, our need to be financially active beyond the current retirement age. But what can we do when we find ourselves retired or redundant with a reduced income or a skinny pension?

In his positive and practical new book, author, thought leader and septuagenarian, Tim Drake, sets out how we can make a new future work for us.

The Canadian Law of Unjust Enrichment and Restitution
Mitchell McInnes (Trinity Hall 1989)

The book is the first and only work devoted to the modern Canadian law of unjust enrichment.

Reflections on Cambridge
Alan Macfarlane

The traditions and creativity of Cambridge University have survived 800 years. In celebration, this first-ever combined historical and anthropological account explores the culture, the customs, the colleges and the politics of this famous institution. As professor here for nearly forty years, the author sets forth on a personal but also dispassionate attempt to understand how this ancient university developed and changed, and how it continues to influence all people who pass through it.

The Worst Golf Course Ever: Coldham Common
Michael Morrison (Darwin 1978)

Bernard Darwin famously described Coldham Common in nineteenth century Cambridge as ‘the worst course I have ever seen, and many others would probably award it a like distinction’. Flat, featureless, frequently waterlogged, with foul-smelling ditches, a rifle range and local hooligans stealing golf balls were just some of the attributes that justified Darwin’s assertion. And yet from modest beginnings in 1869, CUGC would thrive and by the early 1890s, become one of the largest golf clubs in England.

Rivals of the Republic
Annelise Freisenbruch (Newnham 1995)

Rome, 70BC. Roman high society hums with gossip about the sudden, suspicious suicide of a prominent Roman senator. Shortly afterwards, the body of a Vestal Virgin is discovered in the river Tiber.

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