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Image (cropped) by Jessica Ruscello under CC0 1.0 licence

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, please submit your publication's details.

Please note: to have your book considered for inclusion, it’s publication date must be either upcoming or it must have been published during the current calendar year. Unfortunately, we cannot include any details of books published prior to the current year.

Invisible Jumpers
Joseph Ford (St Catharine's 1997)

Photographs of jumpers blending into their background from an inventive 1000-hour knitting project Photographer Joseph Ford and knitting pro Nina Dodd have dedicated more hours than is reasonable to creating bespoke jumpers (for humans, animals and even bananas) that blend seamlessly into their surroundings – from bus seats to bushes, carpets to coastlines. The images are executed with such painstaking precision that should the camera, or jumper for that matter, move by an inch the illusion would unravel.

Meditation for Life
Justyn Comer (Trinity 1988)

Career, relationships, health, happiness, sport, creativity – you name it – they can all be enhanced by the practice of meditation. It has the power to improve every aspect of our lives. Although there has recently been a lot of coverage of meditation, most people still see it narrowly as being a relaxation technique, or a spiritual exercise. It can be both these things, but it is also so much more. This book is an attempt to explain the 'more'.

Burning Souls
David Chernushenko (Clare Hall 1987)

A climate breakdown thriller. Burning Souls is a dramatic tale of courage and friendship in a time of political turmoil and ecological collapse.

Long time best friends Simone, Sagan, Jenny and Jiro learned of the predatory practices driving climate breakdown and social collapse, in a time and place when they could dream of making a difference.

And did.

Ideas of Power: The Politics of American Party Ideology Development
Verlan Lewis (Trinity Hall 2009)

This groundbreaking book challenges the dominant view of ideology held by both political scientists and political commentators. Rather than viewing ideological constructs like liberalism and conservatism as static concepts with fixed and enduring content, Professor Verlan Lewis explains how the very meanings of liberalism and conservatism frequently change along with the ideologies of the two major parties in American politics.

Liberty Intact Human Rights in English Law
Michael Tugendhat (Caius 1963)

The connections between conceptions of rights found in English law and those found in bills of rights around the World? How has English Common Law influenced the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) 1948 and the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) 1950?

Author Unknown: The Power of Anonymity in Ancient Rome
Tom Geue (King's 2008)

From Banksy to Elena Ferrante to the unattributed parchments of ancient Rome, art without clear authorship fascinates and even offends us. Classical scholarship tends to treat this anonymity as a problem or game—a defect to be repaired or mystery to be solved. Author Unknown is the first book to consider anonymity as a site of literary interest rather than a gap that needs filling. We can tether each work to an identity, or we can stand back and ask how the absence of a name affects the meaning and experience of literature.

Let There Be Life. An Intimate Portrait of Robert Edwards
Roger Gosden (Darwin 1970)

 The authorized biography of IVF pioneer Robert Edwards is a compelling account of how he led a medical and social revolution by making babies in ‘test-tubes’. Prevailing against opposition when human embryology was new and sacrosanct territory, he was the champion of women and men with infertility, and now millions owe their existence to assisted reproductive technologies. An improbable hero of science, he was a coal miner’s son and a gritty Yorkshireman who rode a roller-coaster of endeavour to a breakthrough for which he was rewarded with a Nobel Prize and knighthood.

Imagined Futures
Max Saunders (Queens' 1976)

This study provides the first substantial history and analysis of the To-Day and To-Morrow series of 110 books, published by Kegan Paul Trench and Trübner (and E. P. Dutton in the USA) from 1923 to 1931, in which writers chose a topic, described its present, and predicted its future. Contributors included J. B. S. Haldane, Bertrand Russell, Vernon Lee, Robert Graves, Vera Brittain, Sylvia Pankhurst, Hugh McDiarmid, James Jeans, J. D. Bernal, Winifred Holtby, André Maurois, and many others.

The Impact of Jesus in First-Century Palestine. Textual and Archaeological Evidence for Long-standing Discontent
Rosemary-Margaret Luff (Lucy Cavendish 1972)

Although the archaeological evidence indicates a prosperous and thriving Galilee in the early first century CE, the Gospel texts suggest a society under stress, where the rich were flourishing at the expense of the poor. In this multi-disciplinary study, Rosemary Margaret Luff contributes to current debates concerning the pressures on early first-century Palestinian Jews, particularly with reference to socio-economic and religious issues.

Public Perception of International Crises: Identity, Ontological Security and Self-Affirmation
Dmitry Chernobrov (Girton 2009)

How do people make sense of distant, but disturbing international events? Why are some representations more appealing than others? What do they mean for the perceiver’s own sense of self? Going beyond conventional analysis of political imagining and perception at the level of accuracy, this book reveals how self-conceptions are unconsciously, but centrally present in judgments and representations of international others.

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