Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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Psycho-nationalism: Global Thought, Iranian Imaginations (The Global Middle East)
Arshin Adib-Moghaddam (Hughes Hall 2000)

States routinely and readily exploit the grey area between sentiments of national affinity and hegemonic emotions geared to nationalist aggression. In this book, Arshin Adib-Moghaddam focuses on the use of Iranian identity to offer a timely exploration into the psychological and political roots of national identity and how these are often utilised by governments from East to West.

The Hesitant Architect
Maria Haka Flokos (Girton 1980)

Post Millenium Britain...Cambridge after the 800th

"At what point," he thought, "did one's youth become part of history?..."

The return of architects Eleanor Sanders and Peter Hunter, both 80’s alumni, to the University town for a charity event―the televised renovation of a college house in the 12 days leading up to Christmas―is marred by tragedy. As the story unfolds, it soon becomes apparent that the case may not be as cut and dried as it seems and that, perhaps, everyone (save one) could be missing the wood for the Christmas tree…

 

The Stand Back Train
John Ironside (Peterhouse 1952)

Born to the sound of an express whistling through the station, Pal Shripney’s complacent existence of standing back and letting others in life’s train do the rushing by ends when his sister Alice and her Anglican curate husband Jack become lottery winners and call for help. Irreverent Pal finds himself in a strange new ecclesiastical world of diocesan dignitaries and parochial pastoral care. He is enlightened by sharing in a mission project in Thailand, but it is interrupted by Jack catching dengue fever. Publicity of Jack’s win brings grief when his sister Janet is abducted for ransom.

BP Blowout: Inside the Gulf Oil Disaster
Daniel Jacobs (Trinity Hall 1983)

The story of the worst environmental disaster in american history and its enduring consequences....

No Secrets Are Hid
John Ironside (Peterhouse 1952)

Railway enthusiast Pal Shripney’s life ends gently as he listens to Arthur Honneger’s steam engine romp Pacific 231.  But for his son Pip, with his concubine Petra, and for his nephew Harry, a Cambridge history don, the locomotion gains pace. Wanting to marry and raise a family, Pip and Petra face hurdles. Where in this complicated world can an uncle legally marry his niece?  Meanwhile on an aid project in Cambodia they discover mysterious Chloe and unsettling Kevin.

Varian Studies Volume One: Varius
Leonardo de Arrizabalaga y Prado (Trinity 1964)

Varius is the nomen of the Roman emperor misnamed Elagabalus or Heliogabalus. These are names of the Syrian sun god Elagabal, whose high priest Varius was while emperor. There is no evidence that he was ever so called when alive. Thus named, his posthumous legendary or mythical avatar thrives, in academic prose and popular imagination, as a Semitic monster of cruelty, depravity, fanaticism, mockery and extravagance. Recently, this monster has metamorphosed into an anarchist saint and martyr of gay liberation.

Varian Studies Volume Two: Elagabal
Leonardo de Arrizabalaga y Prado (Trinity 1964)

Elagabal is the name of the Syrian sun god whose high priest Varius was, at the same time as Roman emperor, AD 218-222. Because of this connexion, Varius was misnamed Heliogabalus or Elagabalus long after his death. Second in the series VARIAN STUDIES, this book discusses Elagabal’s architectural and sculptural legacy in Rome. These are represented by the Palatine site of THE VARIAN TEMPLE OF ELAGABAL IN ROME, and by relief sculpture on column capitals found in the Roman Forum, showing Elagabal with other deities, in a scene of sacrifice here reconstructed as ELAGABAL’S IDYLL.

Varian Studies Volume Three: A Varian Symposium
Leonardo de Arrizabalaga y Prado (Trinity 1964)

Heliogabalus and Elagabalus are names given since late antiquity to the mythical or legendary avatar of Varius Avitus Bassianus. Varius was Roman emperor AD 218-222, ruling as Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. He was simultaneously High Priest of the Syrian sun god Elagabal. Heliogabalus and Elagabalus, names derived from Elagabal, are often used as misnomers for Varius himself, but more properly designate his avatar, who is far better known than Varius.

Flying With Emma
John Ironside (Peterhouse 1952)

Helicopter pilot Emma Shripney’s steady world is to be shaken up as much as the ground below her as she flies over earthquake stricken Hastings and Napier on New Zealand’s North Island east coast. Rescuing the eighteen stranded people from Te Mata Peak leads to a sharing of tragedy and frustration, to a doomed romantic entanglement, to an involvement in commercial intrigue conflicting with ancient Maori lore, and to the experiencing of happy loyalty and a deepened love for her adopted country.

Things We Nearly Knew
Jim Powell (Trinity Hall 1968)

Jim Powell was chosen as one of the best new novelists by BBC2’s ‘The Culture Show’ in 2011. His third novel explores our ignorance and misconceptions of the people and situations we think we know best. It is a story set in an unnamed place, at an unspecified time, told by an unnamed narrator, that asks: how much do we really know about those closest to us…and how much do we want to know?

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