Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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The Star of the Nomadess: in Harmony between the East and the West (Russian edition)
Esuna Dugarova (Churchill 2005)

A Buryat girl from an indigenous people near Lake Baikal in Siberia shares her experience of earning a doctoral degree from Cambridge University. She reflects upon the peculiarities of English society from the perspective of her Buryat cultural heritage. The book describes how her upbringing in the Soviet system affected her integration into the Western society, how her Asian mentality perceived European norms and values, and how Buddhist philosophy helped her understand the Christian society.

Shakespeare in Modern English
Hugh Macdonald (Pembroke 1958)

Shakespeare in Modern English breaks the taboo about Shakespeare’s texts, which have long been regarded as sacred and untouchable while being widely and freely translated into foreign languages. It is designed to make Shakespeare more easily understood in the theatre without dumbing down or simplifying the content.

Light after Dark I
Charles Francis (Jesus 1975)

Light After Dark 1 is a collection of well-established, but up-to-date, science, both from theory and observation, including material from Charles Francis’ published papers. Francis considers arguments, both for and against, two of the most controversial ideas in modern cosmology. Based on established physics, he suggests that unobserved and exotic substances, cold dark matter and dark energy, can be replaced by an improved understanding of the creation of large scale structure following the Big Bang.

Light after Dark II
Charles Francis (Jesus 1975)

In Light after Dark II: The Large and the Small, Dr Francis explores the physics and the philosophy pertinent to the conceptual foundations of modern physical theory, avoiding equations and with sufficient explanation to be accessible to general readers.

A comprehensive rationale is described for the theories of Einstein, Heisenberg, Dirac, von Neumann, Feynman, and others. Spacetime curvature is elucidated. The meanings of Schrödinger’s cat, Bell’s theorem and Bertlmann’s socks are explained. Implications for determinism, free will, and the nature of space and time are examined.

Agent 110, An American Spymaster and the German Resistance in WWII
Scott Miller (Darwin 1993)

In November 1942, American spymaster Allen Dulles slipped into Switzerland just before Nazi forces sealed the border. His mission: to report on the inner workings of the Third Reich. Code-named Agent 110 by the OSS, he was astounded to find a network of Germans – industrialists, students, diplomats and generals -- conspiring to overthrow Hitler and negotiate a surrender to end World War II. On back roads, in bedrooms, and high in the Alps, Dulles plotted with his ring of renegades who were risking and losing their lives. Yet Dulles was much more than a spy.

The Outside Lands
Hannah Kohler (Corpus 1998)

Jeannie is nineteen when the world changes, Kip only fourteen. The sudden accident that robs them of their mother leaves them adrift, with only their father to guide them. Jeannie seeks escape in work and later marriage to a man whose social connections propel her into an unfamiliar world of wealth and politics. Ill-equipped and unprepared, Jeannie finds comfort where she can. Meanwhile Kip's descent into a life of petty crime is halted only when he volunteers for the Marines.

Sharks & Rays of the Arabian/Persian Gulf
Dareen Almojil (Lucy Cavendish 2011), Alec Moore and William White

The Gulf has a unique diversity of sharks and rays, but for many years their correct identification has been problematic. This fully illustrated book - the first of its kind to focus on the Gulf - brings together the latest research and years of work by the authors to provide a clear and comprehensive guidebook. For each species known to occur in the Gulf, colour images, identification features, and notes on distribution, abundance, ecology and conservation status are provided.

Rethinking Reputational Risk: How to Manage the Risks that can Ruin Your Business, Your Reputation and You
Anthony Fitzsimmons (Pembroke 1969) and Derek Atkins

From ringside seats, I saw three decades' worth of crises as they unfolded, damaging organisations, their leaders, their reputations and their shareholders. But this lawyerly work left important questions unanswered: Why didn't insiders see what was coming? And were these crises 'predictable' only with hindsight?

It took time to uncover why predictable crises kept on happening but answers emerged from research spanning dozens of dissections as we dug in fields that included behavioural economics, anthropology and luck.

After the Final Whistle
Stephen Cooper (Trinity 1977)

When Britain’s Empire went to war in August 1914, rugby players were the first to volunteer: they led from the front and paid a disproportionate price. When Armistice came after four long years, their war game was over; even as the echo of the last guns of November faded, it was time to play rugby again. As Allied troops of all nations waited to return home, sport occupied their minds and bodies.

Modern Social Thought: An Introduction
Anthony Thomson (King's 1977)

This text provides an accessible survey of Western social thought from the early twentieth century to today by tracing the emergence, evolution, and consequence of ideas expressed by recognized social and political theorists as well as poets, novelists, and visual artists. A contextualizing approach helps place theory in broad, practical terms by linking key ideas to specific social, historical, cultural, and political developments.

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