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Image (cropped) by Jessica Ruscello under CC0 1.0 licence

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, please submit your publication's details.

Please note: to have your book considered for inclusion, it’s publication date must be either upcoming or it must have been published during the current calendar year. Unfortunately, we cannot include any details of books published prior to the current year.

Understand, Manage, and Prevent Algorithmic Bias: A Guide for Business Users and Data Scientists
Tobias Baer (Wolfson 2015)

Drawing on his background in both psychology and data science, Tobias argues that there are 6 major sources of algorithmic bias (ranging from statistical artifacts and at least 6 distinct types of data issues to human biases of data scientists, users, as well as society at large) and that both data scientists and business users of algorithms (including managers and government agencies) can and need to contribute to fighting algorithmic bias.

It Keeps Me Seeking: The Invitation from Science, Philosophy and Religion
Andrew Briggs (Queens' 1973)

Here is a fresh look at how science contributes to the bigger picture of human flourishing, through a collage of science and philosophy, richly illustrated by the authors' own experience and personal reflection. They survey the territory of fundamental physics, machine learning, philosophy of human identity, evolutionary biology, miracles, arguments from design, naturalism, the history of ideas, and more. The natural world can be appreciated not only for itself, but also as an eloquent gesture, a narrative and a pointer beyond itself.

The Penultimate Curiosity: How Science Swims in the Slipstream of Ultimate Questions
Andrew Briggs (Queens' 1973)

When young children first begin to ask 'why?' they embark on a journey with no final destination. The need to make sense of the world as a whole is an ultimate curiosity that lies at the root of all human religions. It has, in many cultures, shaped and motivated a more down to earth scientific interest in the physical world, which could therefore be described as penultimate curiosity.

LIfe and Love in Nazi Prague: Letters from an Occupied City
Marie Bader (1886-1942), edited by Kate Ottevanger and Jan Lánícek

Prague, 1940-1942. The Nazi-occupied city is locked in a reign of terror under Reinhard Heydrich. The Jewish community experience increasing levels of persecution, as rumours start to swirl of deportation and an unknown, but widely feared, fate. Amidst the chaos and devastation, Marie Bader, a widow age 56, has found love again with a widower, her cousin Ernst Löwy. Ernst has fled to Greece and the two correspond in a series of deeply heartfelt letters which provide a unique perspective on this period of heightening tension and anguish for the Jewish community.

A Doctor's Lucky Life
Peter Emerson (Clare 1941)

Peppered with memories of patients with remarkable problems, this is the story of a doctor’s journey through decades of healthcare from medical school in war-torn London and qualifying to be a happy junior doctor in 1947. Laced with a blend of healthy cynicism and joie de vivre he describes his subsequent career treating and researching old and new diseases, with appointments in high places providing first-hand insights into the great strengths and occasional weaknesses of the colleagues with whom he worked.

A Proposition for a Multilateral Carbon Tax Treaty
Tatiana Falcao (Darwin 2007)

This book proposes a multilateral framework through which countries may tax mineral resources (oil, gas and coal) and capture the full polluting potential of those energy resources through the tax. The framework is designed so that the tax is only levied once through the mineral resources’ production chain. A compensation mechanism is proposed to account for non-combusted carbon by-products.

The book thus addresses the following issues:

• which type of tax is the most appropriate to capture oil, gas and coal’s polluting ability;

Whistleblowing: Toward a new theory
Kate Kenny (Darwin 2003)

Despite their substantial contribution to society, whistleblowers are considered martyrs more than heroes. When people expose serious wrongdoing in their organizations, they are often punished or ignored. Many end up isolated by colleagues, their professional careers destroyed. The financial industry, rife with scandals, is the focus of Kate Kenny’s penetrating global study.

Time and the Generations
Partha Dasgupta (John's 1962)

How should we evaluate the ethics of procreation, especially the environmental consequences of reproductive decisions on future generations, in a resource-constrained world? While demographers, moral philosophers, and environmental scientists have separately discussed the implications of population size for sustainability, no one has attempted to synthesize the concerns and values of these approaches.

A Book of Secrets
Kate Morrison (Murray Edwards 1998)

A Book of Secrets tells the story of a West African girl hunting for her lost brother through an Elizabethan underworld of spies, plots and secret Catholic printing presses. Susan Charlewood is taken from Ghana (then known as Guinea) as a baby. Brought to England, she grows up as maidservant in a wealthy Catholic household. Living under a Protestant Queen in late 16th Century England, the family risk imprisonment or death unless they keep their faith hidden. When her mistress dies Susan is married off to a London printer who is deeply involved in the Catholic resistance.

Miracle in Kigali, The Rwandan Genocide - a survivor's journey 2019 edition
Paul Dickson (Selwyn 1976) and Illuminée Nganemariya

Miracle in Kigali tells the amazing story of Illuminée Nganemariya and her baby son Roger Nsengiyumva's survival in Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, during the 1994 Genocide and subsequent life in Norwich. First published in 2007 by the Tagman Press, this new edition, which updates Illuminée and Roger's story, including Roger's developing film and TV acting career, has been published to mark the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide.

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