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Image (cropped) by Jessica Ruscello under CC0 1.0 licence

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, please submit your publication's details.

With Honourable Intent - A Natural History of Fauna & Flora International
Tim Knight (St Catharine's 1980)

With Honourable Intent is the previously untold story of an organisation that has been shaping and influencing conservation practice since its foundation in 1903. Fauna & Flora International (FFI) was the world's first international wildlife conservation organisation and has been instrumental in creating much of today's global conservation infrastructure.

Fan Activism, Protest and Politics:Ultras in Post-Socialist Croatia
Andrew Hodges (Clare 2002)

In what sense can organised football fans be understood as political actors or participants in social movements? How do fan struggles link to wider social and political transformations? And what methodological dilemmas arise when researching fan activism? Fan Activism, Protest and Politics seeks ethnographic answers to these questions in a context – Zagreb, Croatia – shaped by the recent Yugoslav wars, nation-state building, post-socialist ‘transition’ and EU accession.

Energy Kingdoms: Oil and Political Survival in the Persian Gulf
Jim Krane (Peterhouse 2009)

After the discovery of oil in the 1930s, the Gulf monarchies—Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, and Bahrain—went from being among the world’s poorest and most isolated places to some of its most ostentatiously wealthy. To maintain support, the ruling sheikhs provide their subjects with boundless cheap energy, unwittingly leading to some of the highest consumption rates on earth.

The Irish Garden: A Cultural History
Peter Dale (Selwyn 1969)

Don’t leave yet. Let there be one more piece of magic to remember the place by.

The Dialectics of Post-Soviet Modernity and the Changing Contours of Islamic Discourse in Azerbaijan
Murad Ismayilov (Darwin 2007)

This book offers a detailed account of the dynamics behind the religious-secular divide in Azerbaijan over the past two decades of independence and the conditions underlying the ongoing process of normalisation of Islamic discourse and the rising cooperation across the country's secular-religious political landscape and looks into some future dynamics this transformation is set to unleash.

The Spirit of Inquiry
Susannah Gibson (Corpus 2008)

Cambridge is now world-famous as a centre of science, but it wasn't always so. Before the nineteenth century, the sciences were of little importance in the University of Cambridge. But that began to change in 1819 when two young Cambridge fellows took a geological field-trip to the Isle of Wight. Adam Sedgwick and John Stevens Henslow spent their days there exploring, unearthing dazzling fossils, dreaming up elaborate theories about the formation of the earth, and bemoaning the lack of serious science in their ancient university.

Islam: An Illustrated Journey
Zulfikar Hirji (Caius 1996)

An Illustrated Journey is a richly illustrated, accessible account of Islamic history that gives the reader an introduction to a faith that is practised today by over a billion people whose traditions and civilisations are rich and diverse.

The Oxford Handbook of John Henry Newman
Benjamin King (Downing 1993)

John Henry Newman (1801-1890) has always inspired devotion. Newman has made disciples as leader of the Catholic revival in the Church of England, an inspiration to fellow converts to Roman Catholicism, a nationally admired preacher and prose-writer, and an internationally recognised saint of the Catholic Church. Nevertheless, he has also provoked criticism. The church authorities, both Anglican and Catholic, were often troubled by his words and deeds, and scholars have disputed his arguments and his honesty.

Ruskinland: How John Ruskin Shapes Our World
Andrew Hill (Trinity 1984)

Who was John Ruskin? What did he achieve – and how? Where is he today? One possible answer: almost everywhere.

The Great River Rowed The Mississippi Million
John Pritchard (Robinson 1983)

After a trip to Ghana with Right To Play, John Pritchard, former Olympic rower and self-confessed middle-aged eccentric, set his next formidable challenge: to row the length of the Mississippi River and raise $1,000,000 for the charity.

John and his team would row in a Victorian Thames skiff, a wooden boat with a fixed wooden seats and fixed pins, the design of which has remained almost unchanged for nearly 200 years.

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