Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, click here to submit publication details.

Flying With Emma
John Ironside (Peterhouse 1952)

Helicopter pilot Emma Shripney’s steady world is to be shaken up as much as the ground below her as she flies over earthquake stricken Hastings and Napier on New Zealand’s North Island east coast. Rescuing the eighteen stranded people from Te Mata Peak leads to a sharing of tragedy and frustration, to a doomed romantic entanglement, to an involvement in commercial intrigue conflicting with ancient Maori lore, and to the experiencing of happy loyalty and a deepened love for her adopted country.

Things We Nearly Knew
Jim Powell (Trinity Hall 1968)

Jim Powell was chosen as one of the best new novelists by BBC2’s ‘The Culture Show’ in 2011. His third novel explores our ignorance and misconceptions of the people and situations we think we know best. It is a story set in an unnamed place, at an unspecified time, told by an unnamed narrator, that asks: how much do we really know about those closest to us…and how much do we want to know?

So High a Blood: The Life of Margaret, Countess of Lennox
Morgan Ring (Caius 2008)

Sometime heir to the English throne, courtier in danger of losing her head, spy-mistress and would-be architect of a united Catholic Britain: Lady Margaret Douglas is the Tudor who survived and triumphed — but at a terrible cost.

366 Days: Compelling Stories From World History
Scott Allsop (Emmanuel 1999)

Stretching from Ancient Rome to the World Wide Web and from the Danelaw to the Cold War, 366 Days is an engaging and entertaining chronicle of the highs and lows of world history. Whether it heralded a world-changing new discovery, the assassination of a leading politician, or a cow flying in a plane, this collection of true stories and trivia from world history proves that there is always something to be remembered 'on this day'. Each historical account has been painstakingly researched to clearly explain its causes, course and consequences.

Deep Sahara
Leslie Croxford (Selwyn 1963)

Recovering from a nervous breakdown provoked by the death of his wife, a man takes advice from a family friend and retreats to a monastery in the deep Sahara to sketch desert insects for a book.

Upon arrival, however, he comes upon an appalling crime. Numb and exhausted, he declines a police chief’s urgent suggestion that he leave. Despite his shock, the desert seems to promise solace, a vast nullity against which he can take stock of himself and do his work.

King Billy and the Royal Road
Reginald Ajuonuma (Darwin College 1999)

King Billy and the Royal Road follows the eponymous Billy as he wakes up hungry one day and, unable to rouse his mother, decides to go out and look for food.

His trip outside becomes a journey in which he learns about the world around him, which he hasn’t been truly exposed to before, and the importance of values such as love and consideration for others.

H is for Hadeda
Alexandra Strnad (Homerton 2004)

“H Is for Hadeda is a luminous sequence of poems from a writer of great intelligence who combines elegance of expression with an excitingly visceral engagement with language. The polished surface, created by Strnad’s extraordinary dexterity and supple control of syntax and diction, belies deeper currents caused by the rift between older, Central European sensibilities and a newer, less urbane and sometimes less forgiving perspective.

The Demon in the Embers
Julia Edwards (Queens' 1995)

If you know how the Great Fire of London starts, you can stop it from happening ... can't you?

Joe Hopkins has been visiting the Tower of London when he slips through time. He finds himself in a city which is dirty, dark and chaotic.

Relieved to be welcomed once more into Lucy's home, he is horrified to find the Great Plague has killed half her family. Worse still, another great danger looms, a danger only Joe can see.

The Falconer's Quarry
Julia Edwards (Queens' 1995)

The key that unlocks Lucy's world has a dangerous power.

It's Easter Saturday, and Joe Hopkins is out riding with his brother. When his horse throws him off, he lands, quite literally, in Tudor England. Joe has learned about the Tudors at school. But if he thinks that will help him, he soon discovers that he knows both too little and too much. He doesn't realise that by giving Lucy his St. Christopher, he is putting her in danger. And when it is taken from her, he faces even greater peril to get it back.

Saving the Unicorn's Horn
Julia Edwards (Queens' 1995)

What can you do when your closest friend lives hundreds of years away?

Joe Hopkins is staying in York for October half-term. He hasn't seen Lucy since the beginning of September and he's really missing her. But when at last he slips through time again, he's alarmed to find himself in a different world altogether. This isn't Roman Britain. It's Jorvik, in the age of the Vikings.

Pages