Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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unlikely spanish don cover
Dame Margaret Joan Anstee DCMG (Newnham 1944)

John Brande Trend, the first Professor of Spanish in Cambridge in 1933, arrived at his Chair by a circuitous route through a variety of disciplines, encountering a host of prominent people in pre-war political, cultural and intellectual life. It was this wider experience that made his teaching so unique and makes his story central to the period through which he lived.

Professor Haroon Ahmed (King's 1959, former Master of Corpus Christi)

Cambridge Computing: The First 75 Years covers the 'halcyon' years of Roger Needham's reign and the expansionist eras of his successors, Robin Milner, Ian Leslie and Andy Hopper. The story begins with Charles Babbage and his 'magical machines' and includes Alan Turing, whose 'Universal Turing Machine' defined the theoretical basis of computability. The central theme of the book is the 75-year history of the Computer Laboratory.

the earthquake observers cover
Deborah R Coen (Trinity 1997)

Earthquakes have taught us much about our planet's hidden structure and the forces that have shaped it. This knowledge rests not only on the recordings of seismographs, but also on the observations of eyewitnesses to destruction. During the nineteenth century, a scientific description of an earthquake was built of stories - stories from as many people in as many situations as possible. Sometimes their stories told of fear and devastation, sometimes of wonder and excitement.

romanticism and the question of the stranger cover
Professor David Simpson (Magdalene 1970)

In our post-9/11 world, the figure of the stranger - the foreigner, the enemy, the unknown visitor - carries a particular urgency, and the force of language used to describe those who are "different" has become particularly strong. But arguments about the stranger are not unique to our time.

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Dr Michael Jackson (Churchill 1968)

Michael Jackson's Lifeworlds is a masterful collection of essays, the culmination of a career aimed at understanding the relationship between anthropology and philosophy. Seeking the truths that are found in the interstices between examiner and examined, world and word, and body and mind, and taking inspiration from James, Dewey, Arendt, Husserl, Sartre, Camus, and, especially, Merleau-Ponty, Jackson creates in these chapters a distinctive anthropological pursuit of existential inquiry. More important, he buttresses this philosophical approach with committed empirical research.

covert sphere cover
Timothy Melley (Girton 1987)

In December 2010 the US Embassy in Kabul acknowledged that it was providing major funding for thirteen episodes of Eagle Four—a new Afghani television melodrama based loosely on the blockbuster US series 24. According to an embassy spokesperson, Eagle Four was part of a strategy aimed at transforming public suspicion of security forces into something like awed respect. Why would a wartime government spend valuable resources on a melodrama of covert operations?

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Dr David Esterly (St Catharine's 1966)

Awestruck by the sight of a Grinling Gibbons carving in a London church, David Esterly chose to dedicate his life to the art - its physical control, intricate beauty and intellectual demands. Forty years later, he is the foremost practitioner of Gibbons's forgotten technique, which revolutionised ornamental sculpture in the late 1600s. After a fire at Hampton Court Palace in 1986 destroyed much of Gibbons's masterpiece, the job fell to David Esterly to restore his idol's work to its former glory.

Dr Christopher Chippindale (curator at the Cambridge University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology) and Dr Frederick Baker (Co-Director of the Cambridge University Prehistoric Picture Project,G uest Lecturer, Cambridge University Screen Media and Cult

• P • I • T • O • T • I • presents the fascinating results of the meeting of new digital arts with ancient rock-art images, known as pitoti in the dialect of Valcamonica. The prehistoric pictures, with which the Alpine valley abounds, become like film stills in a vast cinema auditorium. Their peck-marks, pexils, hammered in the rock have been transformed in the pixels of digital imagery.

Jennie Rooney (St John's 1998)

Joan's voice is almost a whisper. 'Nobody talked about what they did during the war. We all knew we weren't allowed to.' Joan Stanley has a secret. She is a loving mother, a doting grandmother, and leads a quiet, unremarkable life in the suburbs. Then one morning there is a knock on the door, and suddenly the past she has been so keen to hide for the last fifty years threatens to overturn her comfortable world. Cambridge University in 1937 is awash with ideas and idealists, yet unworldly Joan feels better suited to a science lecture and a cup of cocoa.

Michael Marshall (King's 1984)

Have you ever wondered what happens to friends from the past when you move on and don’t need them any longer…?

David is an author, on the verge of having his first novel published. His life is finally looking up after years of struggle. But a chance encounter with a man who whispers ‘Remember me?’ is just the start of a chain of sinister events. Catherine has everything she could wish for; a strong marriage, two children, a house in an affluent area of Manhattan, but she believes she’s being stalked....

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