Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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Stephanie Dalley (Newnham 1962)

Recognised since ancient times as one of the Seven Wonders of the World, the legendary Hanging Garden of Babylon and its location have long remained a mystery. It was on the “must see” list of Greek and Roman travellers centuries after its supposed existence, yet no trace could be found by excavation or in Babylonian inscriptions. So what did it look like? Who made it? How did the tradition arise?

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Alexia Casale (Trinity Hall 1999)

A debut young adult novel, The Bone Dragon is a contemporary psychological thriller, with a touch of magical realism. The story is told from the viewpoint of Evie, a fourteen-year-old girl damaged by a past she can't talk about, in a hypnotic narrative that, while giving increasing insight, also becomes increasingly unreliable.

A blend of psychological thriller and fairytale, The Bone Dragon explores the fragile boundaries between real life and fantasy, and the darkest corners of the human mind.

we sang better vol2 cover
James Anderson (Trinity Hall 1970)

In We Sang Better, two hundred of these singers explain the art of singing in over 70,000 of their own words. Much of their evidence is appearing for the first time in a modern edition. In Volume 2 Why It Was Better (260 pp) the singers explain how they enabled the possibility of superlative singing.

we sang better vol 1 cover
James Anderson (Trinity Hall 1970)

In We Sang Better, two hundred singers explain the art of singing in over 70,000 of their own words. Much of their evidence is appearing for the first time in a modern edition. In Volume 1 How We Sang (490 pp) the singers present their basic advice.

after the great east japan earthquake
Edited by Gijs Berends (Queens' 1996) and Dominic Al-Badri

The triple disaster that struck Japan in March 2011 began with the most powerful earthquake known to have hit Japan and led to tsunami up to 40 meters in height that devastated a wide area and caused thousands of deaths. The ensuing accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant was Japan's worst and only second to Chernobyl in its severity.

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Edited by Ron Elsdon (Churchill 1972)

Social responsibility has become a goal for both employers and employees in the business community. But what does the term “social responsibility” mean, and what paths must businesses take to make a positive impact on society? Business Behaving Well provides a rationale and roadmap that will enable businesses to integrate social responsibility into their purpose and operations.

unlikely spanish don cover
Dame Margaret Joan Anstee DCMG (Newnham 1944)

John Brande Trend, the first Professor of Spanish in Cambridge in 1933, arrived at his Chair by a circuitous route through a variety of disciplines, encountering a host of prominent people in pre-war political, cultural and intellectual life. It was this wider experience that made his teaching so unique and makes his story central to the period through which he lived.

Professor Haroon Ahmed (King's 1959, former Master of Corpus Christi)

Cambridge Computing: The First 75 Years covers the 'halcyon' years of Roger Needham's reign and the expansionist eras of his successors, Robin Milner, Ian Leslie and Andy Hopper. The story begins with Charles Babbage and his 'magical machines' and includes Alan Turing, whose 'Universal Turing Machine' defined the theoretical basis of computability. The central theme of the book is the 75-year history of the Computer Laboratory.

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Deborah R Coen (Trinity 1997)

Earthquakes have taught us much about our planet's hidden structure and the forces that have shaped it. This knowledge rests not only on the recordings of seismographs, but also on the observations of eyewitnesses to destruction. During the nineteenth century, a scientific description of an earthquake was built of stories - stories from as many people in as many situations as possible. Sometimes their stories told of fear and devastation, sometimes of wonder and excitement.

romanticism and the question of the stranger cover
Professor David Simpson (Magdalene 1970)

In our post-9/11 world, the figure of the stranger - the foreigner, the enemy, the unknown visitor - carries a particular urgency, and the force of language used to describe those who are "different" has become particularly strong. But arguments about the stranger are not unique to our time.

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