Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, click here to submit publication details.

Graham Lee (Clare 1999)

The 'fighting season' in Afghanistan is that strange annual pattern of the local fighters who re-emerge every year, apparently undaunted. So there is something wry about these reflections, by a much-admired British PARA officer, on the real-life experience of our country mission to promote democracy and cut off terrorism in Afghanistan - and of the extraordinary resilience of the Army's enemy there.

extramural
Adrian Barlow (former Director of of Public & Professional Programmes and lecturer in English Literature at the University of Cambridge's Institute of Continuing Education (ICE), Senior Member of Wolfson College)

Extramural: Literature and Lifelong Learning is an account of the authors time teaching literature at the University of Cambridge Institute of Continued Education. Extramural makes the case that adult education is of continued relevance despite increasing marginalisation and closure. The Institute's founder, James Stuart, had a bold and idealistic vision of broadening education from the elite confines of the Oxbridge colleges to all of society, envisaging a community of adult learners.

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Dr John Rigg (Trinity 1974)

It is August 1961 and a 6 year-old boy, sitting on his father’s shoulders, is watching a rugby match in south Leeds. He is immediately hooked on the experience of the sporting event, viewed live and in the flesh… fast forward to August 2011. A man in late middle age is watching another rugby match.

John Rigg has been an ‘ordinary spectator’ – not only of rugby (league and union), but of football and cricket and a range of other sports – for 50 years.

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Dr Simone Ahuja, Professor Jaideep Prabhu (Jawaharlal Nehru Professor of Indian Business and Enterprise and director of the Centre for India & Global Business at Cambridge Judge Business School, Fellow of Clare College) and Navi Radjou (member of the CJBS

Jugaad Innovation argues the West must look to places like India, Brazil, and China for a new approach to frugal and flexible innovation. The authors show how in these emerging markets, jugaad (a Hindi word meaning an improvised solution born from ingenuity and cleverness) is leading to dramatic growth and how Western companies can adopt jugaad innovation to succeed in our hypercompetitive world.

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Professor Nicholas Humphrey (Trinity 1961)

How is consciousness possible? What biological purpose does it serve? Why do we value it so highly?

In Soul Dust the psychologist Nicholas Humphrey, a leading figure in consciousness research, returns to the front-line with a startling new theory.

Consciousness, he argues, is nothing less than a magical-mystery show that we stage for ourselves inside our own heads. This self-made show lights up the world for us, making us feel special and transcendent.

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Ian Goldin, Geoffrey Cameron and Dr Meera Balarajan (Darwin 2000)

Throughout history, migrants have fueled the engine of human progress. Their movement has sparked innovation, spread ideas, relieved poverty, and laid the foundations for a global economy. In a world more interconnected than ever before, the number of people with the means and motivation to migrate will only increase.

Professor Jermiah P Ostriker and Dr Simon Mitton (St Edmind's 1968, Fellow of St Edmund's)

Heart of Darkness describes the incredible saga of humankind's quest to unravel the deepest secrets of the universe. Over the past thirty years, scientists have learned that two little-understood components - dark matter and dark energy - comprise most of the known cosmos, explain the growth of all cosmic structure, and hold the key to the universe's fate.

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Keith Kahn-Harris (Robinson 1991)

The Best Waterskier In Luxembourg recounts sociologist Keith Kahn-Harris's encounters with those who dedicate their lives to the pursuit of excellence while almost no one else is looking. It’s a book about unsung heroes, in unsung communities, doing incredible things. It’s mostly travelogue, with a bit of sociology thrown in. It’s also a challenge he has set himself to discover worlds he knows nothing about, to search out the odd, the quirky and the eccentric but not to ridicule them.

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Andrew Hunter-Blair (Cambridge resident and local history author)

Cambridge University is one of the most well-known and iconic universities, boasting a reputation unsurpassed by few others. This new title from Andrew Hunter-Blair provides a unique insight into the workings, both past and present, of the 31 colleges that comprise Cambridge University, showcasing the college connections whilst also detailing the university’s diverse roles.

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Dr M C Mirow (Gonville & Caius 1988)

St. Augustine’s central square, the Plaza de la Constitución, is not named for the United States Constitution. Instead, its name comes from Florida’s first constitution, the Spanish Constitution of Cádiz of 1812.

Daily political life in Florida’s Spanish colonial cities was governed by this document, and cities like St. Augustine ordered their activities around the requirements, rights, and duties expressed in this Constitution. This Constitution governed Spanish Florida from 1812 to 1815 and then again from 1820 until 1821 when Spain turned Florida over to the United States.

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