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Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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Please note: to have your book considered for inclusion, its publication date must be either upcoming or it must have been published during the last 12 months. Unfortunately, we cannot include any details of books published prior to this time.

Elephant Complex
John Gimlette
No one sees the world quite like John Gimlette. As the New York Times once noted ‘he writes with enormous wit, indignation and a heightened sense of the absurd’.  Writing for both the adventurer and the armchair traveler, he has an eye for unusually telling detail, a sense of wonder, and compelling curiosity for the inside story. This time, he travels to Sri Lanka, a country only now emerging from 26 years of civil war.  Delving deep into the nation’s story, Gimlette provides us with an astonishing multifaceted portrait of the island today. 
 
Thomas and Charity Rotch, The Quaker Experience of Settlement in Ohio
Barbara K. Wittman
This study of New England transplants Thomas and Charity Rotch to Ohio country,explores their roles in the transformation of the frontier environment from wilderness to a prosperous market town. The book uses a wide selection of archival sources to provide insights into early community building in Ohio. The letters of Charity Rotch suggest that Quaker women forged particular sorts of relationships that encouraged their interconnections and interdependence. Women also recognized the significance of gender int their lives as they defined themselves collectively as women.
The God Book
DR MICHAEL ARNHEIM
A WHOLE NEW TAKE ON ATHEISM AND RELIGION.  Which is right, atheism or organised religion? Answer: Neither.  What’s wrong with atheism?  The intolerant radical “New Atheists” of today champion the theory of evolution by natural selection, which may help to explain small changes and variations in living things but can’t explain the origin of the universe or the origin of life – because natural selection needs life to kick-start it into action.  No life, no natural selection!
 
The Aesthetics of Middlebrow Fiction: Popular US Novels, Modernism, and Form, 1945–75
Tom Perrin
The Aesthetics of Middlebrow Fiction examines the critically acclaimed, popular novels that were labeled "middlebrow" in the US during the Cold War. This period saw a vogue for the term 'middlebrow,' with articles on the topic in magazines like Harper's and Life; there was even a song about "Middle Brow" taste in Touch and Go, a 1949 Broadway revue. The project treats the middlebrow novel not as marginal but as central to the tradition of American literature.
The Show Must Go On!
John Mullen
Using a collection of over one thousand popular songs from the war years, as well as around 150 soldiers’ songs, John Mullen provides a fascinating insight into the world of popular entertainment during the First World War.  Mullen considers the position of songs of this time within the history of popular music, and the needs, tastes and experiences of working-class audiences who loved this music.  To do this, he dispels some of the nostalgic, rose-tinted myths about music hall.
Test & First Class Cricketers Killed in the Great War
Nigel McCrery

While cricket remains hugely popular with all age groups today, at the beginning of the Twentieth Century, it was the national game.

The Silk Roads by Peter Frankopan cover image
Peter Frankopan

The sun is setting on the Western world. Slowly but surely, the direction in which the world spins has reversed: where for the last five centuries the globe turned westwards on its axis, it now turns to the east...For centuries, fame and fortune was to be found in the west - in the New World of the Americas. Today, it is the east which calls out to those in search of adventure and riches.

Cover image of The Versions of Us by Laura Barnett
Laura Barnett

The Versions of Us is a love story told three ways. A young man is walking down a country lane. A woman, cycling towards him, swerves to avoid a dog. On that moment, their future hinges. There are three possible outcomes, three small decisions that could determine the rest of their lives.

The Mays - Twenty Three
Emily Fitzell (Editor) Quentin Blake & Alison Turnbull

Founded in 1992, THE MAYS publishes an annual selection of the best and most exciting new writing and artwork from students at the universities of Cambridge and Oxford.

War is a failure of politics
Henry Disney

A collection of poems against war from a Christian viewpioint and from experience of active service, etc.

Cover image of The Chosen Queen by Joanna Courtney
Joanna Courtney

As a young woman in England’s royal court Edyth, granddaughter of Lady Godiva, dreams of marrying for love. But political matches are rife while King Edward is still without an heir and the future of England is uncertain. When Edyth’s family are exiled to the wild Welsh court, she falls in love with the charismatic King of Wales but their romance catapults her onto the opposing side of a bitter feud with England in which Edyth’s only allies are Earl Harold Godwinson and his handfasted wife, Lady Svana.

Travels into Print
Innes M. Keighren, Charles W. J. Withers, and Bill Bell

In eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain, books of travel and exploration were much more than simply the printed experiences of intrepid authors.

The Railways of Great Britain: A Historical Atlas
Col. Michael Cobb MA FRICS MInstRE PhD
The only railway atlas to Great Britain in existence and the definitive historic guide to all the railways in Britain, both existing and lost. All train lines in operation between 1807 and 1994 are dramatically set in colour against an Ordnance Survey grid, alongside the names of the companies that built them, and the opening and closing dates of the stations they connect.
 
This formidable luxury atlas is a vital tool for anyone interested in railways and the history, geography and economy of Great Britain.
 
An Industrious Mind
J. Sears McGee
This is the first biography of Sir Simonds D'Ewes, Baronet, a member of the Long Parliament, Puritan, lawyer, historian and antiquarian who lived from 1602-1650. He studied at St. John's College, Cambridge (1618-1620) and the Middle Temple (1620-1626). Because his country seat at Stowlangtoft in Suffolk is only a day's ride from Cambridge, he visits the university on numerous occasions and maintained ties with dons there.
Cam to Zambezi
Tony Schur (Editor)
From the Cam to the Zambezi records the experiences of a group of young people who first met in Cambridge, and then went on to live and work in Africa during a time of constitutional change and historically important events.
 
The book is set in Zambia (formerly Northern Rhodesia) and covers the last few years of colonial rule and, in some of the chapters, the early years of the new nation after it gained independence in 1964.  The authors are individuals, who attended the 1961-62 Overseas Services Course held in Cambridge, and three of their wives.
Ineffability and Religious Experience
Guy Bennett-Hunter
Ineffability – that which cannot be explained in words – lies at the heart of the Christian mystical tradition. It has also been part of every discussion of religious experience since the early twentieth century. Despite this centrality, ineffability is a concept that has largely been ignored by philosophers of religion.
Why Call Me God - The Gospel Seen with a Single Eye
J H Hatfield
This book breaks fresh ground in our age by bringing to light a matter of immense cultural importance, the secret meaning of the Gospels.
 
The approach taken is to dissect the riddles, as found in the Greek source texts. In this way we learn to identify two elementary compositional devices deployed by the authors to conceal, within their literal text, an additional component of the gospel message.
 
Deep Time
Anthony Nanson

Deep Time is a romantic lost-world eco-thriller by writer and storyteller Anthony Nanson. It’s an odyssey through lucidly evoked prehistoric ages, and a passionate human drama in which a tense love triangle plays out as a struggle to connect with the wild. At a time when global warming looms, this novel takes the reader back through previous catastrophic geological events, and then forward again to see the world afresh.  Zoologist Dr Brendan Merlie has wasted his best years in futile pursuit of imaginary creatures.

BREAKING BOUNDS  Six Newnham Lives
Claire Tomalin, Jenn Ashworth, Margaret Drabble, Sarah LeFanu, Elaine Feinstein, Sue Limb, ed. Biddy Passmore

Six leading authors who went to Newnham write about six remarkable women who attended the college in its early years: 

Cover of Cambridge Inscriptions Explained
Nancy Gregory (Newnham 1959)

Like the inscriptions themselves, the author's comments condense a great deal of research and observation into a small compass' writes Professor Easterling in her foreword. This is Nancy Gregory's special gift: to make the Latin inscriptions with which Cambridge abounds come to life in a voice both witty and scholarly.

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