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Image (cropped) by Jessica Ruscello under CC0 1.0 licence

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, please submit your publication's details

Please note: to have your book considered for inclusion, its publication date must be either upcoming or it must have been published during the last 12 months. Unfortunately, we cannot include any details of books published prior to this time.

The Humanist Interpretation of Hieroglyphs in the Allegorical Studies of the Renaissance
Karl Giehlow translated by Robin Raybould

This the first English translation of Giehlow's celebrated Die Hieroglyphenkunde now recognized as the classic and pioneering statement on the origin and history of the Renaissance obsession with Egyptian hieroglyphs. The original, published in 1915 and inspired by Giehlow's discovery of a 16th century Latin manuscript of the Hieroglyphica of Horapollo illustrated by Albrecht Durer, has been described by critics as 'monumental', a 'masterpiece', 'incomparable' and 'brilliant'.

The Humm Handbook
Christopher Golis MA MBA FAICD FAIM

People drive performance, emotions drive people, temperament drives emotions. Emotional Intelligence is achieving self- and social mastery by being smart with core emotions. Self-Mastery = Awareness + Management (Steps 1 & 2 as defined by Goleman) Social Mastery = Empathy + Social Skills (Steps 3 &4 as defined by Goleman However the key to emotional intelligence is understanding your core emotions compared to your transient emotions. Your core emotions are driven by your temperament – what you are genetically born with.

Take A Punt
Geoff Robinson

Featuring more than 200 photos of punting on the River Cam. The book includes lots of photos of the Cambridge University colleges, students at the May Balls and students on the river after their exams.

Cover of The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins
Dr 'Hal' Whitehead (Christ's 1970) and Luke Rendell

Drawing on their own research as well as a scientific literature as immense as the sea-including evolutionary biology, animal behavior, ecology, anthropology, psychology, and neuroscience the authors seek to define what cetacean culture is, why it exists, and what it means for the future of whales and dolphins.

Cover of An Architect Speaks ed by David Valinsky
David Valinsky (Fitzwilliam 2003)

An Architect Speaks presents E S Prior's fascinating writings for the first time to a modern audience, together with a much wider selection of his buildings than has ever before been published. Today he is best known as the designer behind some of the most inventive and uncompromising interpretations of Ruskinian craft architecture that the English Arts and Crafts Movement produced.

Cover of Freeing the Innocent by Stephen Jakobi
Stephen Jakobi (Clare 1953)

Stephen Jakobi's riveting account of his life as a leading international human rights lawyer

Cover of The New Math by Christopher J Phillips
Christopher J Phillips (Emmanuel 2004)

An era of sweeping cultural change in America, the postwar years saw the rise of beatniks and hippies, the birth of feminism, and the release of the first video game. This book examines the rise and fall of the new math as a marker of the period's political and social ferment.

Cover of Essential Dynamics and Relativity by Peter J O'Donnell
Peter J O'Donnell (Homerton 1992)

Essential Dynamics & Relativity provides students with an introduction to the core aspects of dynamics and special relativity. The author reiterates important ideas and terms throughout and covers concepts that are often missing from other textbooks at this level.

Cover of Landmarks by Robert Macfarlane
Dr Robert Macfarlane (Pembroke 1994)

Landmarks presents a joyous meditation on words, landscape and the relationship between the two. This is a field guide to the literature of nature, and a glossary containing thousands of remarkable words used in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales to describe land, nature and weather.

Cover of Charles Darwin's Recipe Book Revived and Illustrated
Dusha Bateson and Weslie Janeway

Like many wives of yesterday and today, Emma Wedgwood Darwin, wife of Charles Darwin, compiled a cookery notebook revealing a lifestyle at the top of English society and intelligentsia.

Although Emma's recipes are well known to scholars and researchers, Dusha Bateson and Weslie Janeway provide the general public a treasure trove of fifty-five of her recipes for the first time, each one tested by the authors for today's cook with commentary and botanical illustrations.

Glimpse
Kendra Leighton

A debut young adult novel, Glimpse is a modern ghost story inspired by a classic poem.

Liz just wants to be normal. Her life is anything but.

Seven years ago Liz lost her mother and ten years' worth of memories.  When she inherits the infamous Highwayman Inn, she hopes the move will be a fresh start.  Then she meets Zachary.  Zachary who haunts her by night and in dreams; who makes her question everything she is and wants to be; who seems scarcely real - yet makes her feel so alive.

CUWBC book cover
Jane Kingsbury (Murray Edwards, New Hall 1969) and Dr Carol Williams (Darwin 1969)

In the early 1970s, Jane Kingsbury and Carol Williams rowed for Cambridge University Women’s Boat Club (CUWBC). Now they have chronicled the development of the club through its struggle to gain recognition in women’s varsity rowing to the point where it has provided the nation with a remarkable number of international and Olympic oarswomen and will finally compete against Oxford on the Thames in London just as the men of Cambridge University Boat Club (CUBC) do.

The Scrivener
Robin Blake

The Scrivener presents a third mystery to be solved by 18th century coroner of Preston, Titus Cragg, and his friend Dr Luke Fidelis, following their previous adventures in A Dark Anatomy (2011) and Dark Waters (2012). The ingenuity of the investigators is taxed to the limit as a goldsmith's body is found in a locked room, the town's investments in the Guinea Trade go missing, and the hunt is on for a buried Civil War treasure. "Truth, Sir, that is what counts: more than punishment, more even than retribution.

Hitler's Philosophers
Yvonne Sherratt

Hitler saw himself as a 'philosopher-leader', and astonishingly gained the support of many intellectuals of his time. In this compelling book, Yvonne Sherratt explores Hitler's relationship with philosophers - those who supported his rise to power and those whose lives were wrecked by his regime.

Identity, Neoliberalism and Aspiration
Garth Stahl

In recent years there has been growing concern over the pervasive disparities in academic achievement that are highly influenced by ethnicity, class and gender. Specifically, within the neoliberal policy rhetoric, there has been concern over underachievement of working-class young males, specifically white working-class boys. The historic persistence of this pattern, and the ominous implication of these trends on the long-term life chances of white working-class boys, has led to a growing chorus that something must be done to intervene.

The Desert: Lands of Lost Borders
Michael Welland (Selwyn 1965)

Lands of extremes, contrasts, metaphor and myth, deserts cover nearly a third of our planet's land area and are home to more than half a billion people. The desert as an idea has long captured the Western imagination, but too often in ways that fail to grasp the true scope and diversity of these spaces and the realities of the lives of people for whom arid lands are home. For the outsider, stories of the desert are about the exotic, about adventures into hostile territory. Few of us consider the perspectives of those who make their livelihoods in the desert each day.

Attention Cooperation Purpose
Robert French (St Catharine's, 1967), Peter Simpson

This book describes an approach based on attention that can help individuals and groups to cooperate more effectively. It presents the first book-length reassessment of Wilfred Bion’s ideas on groups. Every group has a purpose or purposes - or, as Bion put it, “every group, however casual, meets to ‘do’ something.” The approach described here shows how individual group members’ use of attention – both broad or “evenly suspended” and focused – can promote a better understanding of purpose, making it possible for them to do what they have met to do.

Eye of the Beholder
Laura J. Snyder

The remarkable story of how an artist and a scientist in seventeenth-century Holland transformed the way we see the world.

On a summer day in 1674, in the small Dutch city of Delft, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek—a cloth salesman, local bureaucrat, and self-taught natural philosopher—gazed through a tiny lens set into a brass holder and discovered a never-before imagined world of microscopic life. At the same time, in a nearby attic, the painter Johannes Vermeer was using another optical device, a camera obscura, to experiment with light and create the most luminous pictures ever beheld.

Grim
Kate Newmann

A profound realisation of suffering unequalled in Irish poetry. This volume of emotionally courageous poems is destined to find an enduring place in the canon of Holocaust literature. To read these poems is to taste sorrow. Cathal O'Searcaigh

Susan Sontag has delineated the pornography of fascism; these poems chart its lunacy, its aberrant, horrific, distortions of reason. Paula Meehan, Ireland Professor of Poetry

Reinventing Development
Lord Mawuko-Yevugah (Downing, 2003)

Global development actors such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund claim that the shift to the poverty reduction strategy framework and emphasis on local participation address the social cost of earlier adjustment programs and help put aid-receiving countries back in control of their own development agenda.

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