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Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, please submit your publication's details

Please note: to have your book considered for inclusion, its publication date must be either upcoming or it must have been published during the last 12 months. Unfortunately, we cannot include any details of books published prior to this time.

The Great Game in West Asia
Mehran Kamrava (King's 1984)

The Great Game in West Asia examines the strategic competition between Iran and Turkey for power and influence in the South Caucasus. As much of the world's attention has been diverted to conflicts and flashpoints near and far, a new great game has been unravelling between Iran and Turkey in the South Caucasus.

Inside the Arab State
Mehran Kamrava (King's 1984)

 The 2011 Arab uprisings and their subsequent aftermath have thrown into question some of our long-held assumptions about the foundational aspects of the Arab state. While the regional and international consequences of the uprisings continue to unfold with great unpredictability, their ramifications for the internal lives of the states in which they unfolded are just as dramatic and consequential. States historically viewed as models of strength and stability have been shaken to their foundations.

Troubled Waters: Insecurity in the Persian Gulf
Mehran Kamrava (King's 1984)

The book’s primary research question explores the causes of chronic insecurity in the Persian Gulf? The Persian Gulf remains one of the most heavily militarized and insecure regions in the world.

The Impossibility of Palestine: History, Geography, and the Road Ahead
Mehran Kamrava (King's 1984)

This book tells the story of Palestine. This is a story that has been told many times before. But while the story itself is not new, its retelling and its conclusions are. Palestine, this book maintains, is neither viable nor possible any more. This lack of viability is due to developments that go beyond its mere physical and territorial dismemberment. It is on this issue, namely the growing noncontiguity of the West Bank because of Israeli settlements, that most existing conclusions of Palestine’s lack of viability are based.

Gateways to the World: Port Cities in the Persian Gulf
Mehran Kamrava (King's 1984)

The Persian Gulf region has become home to some of the world's fastest growing, most impressive cities, many of them with global aspirations. Gateways to the World presents an in-depth, systematic, and multi-disciplinary approach to the study of these cities. It begins with a broader look at how the emergence and significance of cities along the Persian Gulf waterway should be contextualized.

"St. Clive:" An Eastern Orthodox Author Looks Back at C.S. Lewis
Christos Hayward (St Edmund's)

“St. Clive:” An Eastern Orthodox Author Looks Back at C.S. Lewis, adopts an unusual perspective because most examinations of the spirituality of C.S. Lewis come from Western spiritual perspectives, and few adopt the approach of C.J.S. Hayward, who opens his book with a Lewis-type series of letters to a guardian angel, “The Angelic Letters: a Heavenly analogue to The Screwtape Letters.” The book is even more distinctive in reflecting back on Lewis from a perspective meant to be thoroughly Orthodox.

Nightmarch: Among India's Revolutionary Guerrillas
Alpa Shah (Newnham 1994)

Shortlisted for the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing.

Shortlisted for the 2019 New India Foundation Book Prize.

A first-hand account of India’s widespread leftist insurgency, and the state’s brutal response.

City of Beasts: How animals shaped Georgian London
Thomas Almeroth-Williams

By the early 1800s, an estimated 31,000 horses were at work in and around London, while around the same number of sheep and cattle were driven through the city’s streets every week. No other settlement in Europe or North America had ever accommodated so many large four-legged animals, or felt their influence so profoundly.

Environment of Hate: The New Normal for Muslims in the UK
Arzu Merali (King's 1989) and Saied Reza Ameli

Environment of Hate: The New Normal for Muslims in the UK provides shocking insight into the UK as an ever developing ‘Stasi state’ rife with hatred for the ‘suspect’ Muslim community. With analysis at every level – from grassroots to institutions – the authors examine the construction of an environment where Muslims are feared and loathed.

Wise and Foolish Love in the Song of Songs
Jennifer Andruska (Hughes Hall 2018)

For some time scholars have debated whether the Song of Songs, a small book of love poetry in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, has connections to the wisdom genre and how this changes our understanding of it.  Wisdom literature in the ancient world was particularly concerned with how to live a successful life, in all areas, and this book shows that this included one love life.  It demonstrates that the Song of Songs has combined elements of the ancient Near Eastern love song and wisdom genres to produce a wisdom literature about romantic love, inspiring readers to pursue a particular type of

The Walrus's Handbook
Hazel Skelsey Guest (Newnham 1946)

How to understand ourselves and our interactions with others, including a new take on an old theory (Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs) and research not previously published in book form (Marshall's Scale of Responses). Written in an easy-to-read style in order to be accessible to the intelligent layperson, but also of value to professionals.

Earth's Still Centre
Malcolm Prue (Peterhouse1968)

Most of the poems in this collection have their origins in the countryside of Norfolk where the author lives. The collection takes the form of a cycle of the twelvemonth.

The Price of Paradise
Iain Overton (Downing 1992)

We live in the age of the suicide bomber. The suicide bomb itself takes more lives than any other type of explosive weapon. Moreover, in the last 5 years more people have been killed by suicide attacks than at any other time in history.

How has this descent deep into the heart of terror escalated in such a way? What drives people to blow themselves up and what are the consequences? More importantly perhaps, what can be done to combat the rising spread of this form of violence?

Gun Baby Gun
Iain Overton (Downing 1992)

There are almost one billion guns across the globe today – more than ever before. There are 12 billion bullets produced every year - almost two bullets for every person on this earth. And as many as 500,000 people are killed by them every year worldwide.

The gun's impact is long-reaching and often hidden. And it doesn't just involve the dead, the wounded, the suicidal and the mourning. It involves us all.

Sensations: The Story of British Art form Hogarth to Banksy
Jonathan Jones

“Sensations presents a radically new story of British art. It connects the artists of today with British culture more than three hundred years ago as it finds an unexpected thread that links William Hogarth and Tracey Emin, Thomas Gainsborough and Lucian Freud. What they share is an eye for the real world. I hope this book will change how you see Britain, and its art.” – Jonathan Jones

The Bengal Delta. Ecology, State and Social Change 1840-1943
Iftekhar Iqbal (Fitzwilliam 2001)

With a focus on colonial Bengal, this book demonstrates how the dynamics of agrarian prosperity or decline, communal conflicts, poverty and famine can only be properly understood from an ecological perspective as well as discussions of state's coercion and popular resistance, market forces and dependency, or contested cultures and consciousness.

Culture Shift: A Practical Guide to Managing Organizational Culture
Kirsty Bashforth (Catharine's 1988)

Nowadays, stakeholder consideration focuses as much on an organization's culture as it does on the bottom line – employees want to work for a company that has clear values and an engaging environment; customers and clients want to know they're supporting a worthwhile brand; and investors look to back socially responsible companies with good organizational health.

Mind Games. Determination, Doubt and Lucky Socks: an Insider's Guide to the Psychology of Elite Athletes
Annie Vernon (Downing 2001)

It's well known that to reach the top in elite sport, you need to have spent years honing and perfecting your physical ability. However this is only part of the template required to win – the other half is about mind games.

Throughout her career as one of the world's top athletes, Annie Vernon struggled with existential questions about the purpose of sport in our comfortable, first-world society: Why do we do it? What is it in our psyche that makes us push ourselves to the limit? What allows us to mentally overcome the physical pain?

The Painting
Anthony Stevens (Churchill 1969)

The Painting is a novel for anyone interested in the weird and (sometimes) wonderful world of contemporary art.

The art world is dismayed when famous British neo-conceptual artist Matt Stadleigh is found drowned in the Thames one week before the opening of his first major retrospective exhibition in London. At that opening, everyone is astonished to see his latest creation – kept a close secret till then and radically different from anything he has done before.

A painting. An oil painting. An ‘easel painting’!

Professor Maxwell's Duplicitous Demon
Brian Clegg

James Clerk Maxwell, an unassuming Victorian Scotsman, explained how we perceive colour. He uncovered the way gases behave. And, most significantly, he transformed the way physics was undertaken in his explanation of the interaction of electricity and magnetism, revealing the nature of light and laying the groundwork for everything from Einstein’s special relativity to modern electronics. And, as first Cavendish Professor, he was responsible for establishing the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge.

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