Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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Deep Time
Anthony Nanson

Deep Time is a romantic lost-world eco-thriller by writer and storyteller Anthony Nanson. It’s an odyssey through lucidly evoked prehistoric ages, and a passionate human drama in which a tense love triangle plays out as a struggle to connect with the wild. At a time when global warming looms, this novel takes the reader back through previous catastrophic geological events, and then forward again to see the world afresh.  Zoologist Dr Brendan Merlie has wasted his best years in futile pursuit of imaginary creatures.

BREAKING BOUNDS  Six Newnham Lives
Claire Tomalin, Jenn Ashworth, Margaret Drabble, Sarah LeFanu, Elaine Feinstein, Sue Limb, ed. Biddy Passmore

Six leading authors who went to Newnham write about six remarkable women who attended the college in its early years: 

Cover of Cambridge Inscriptions Explained
Nancy Gregory (Newnham 1959)

Like the inscriptions themselves, the author's comments condense a great deal of research and observation into a small compass' writes Professor Easterling in her foreword. This is Nancy Gregory's special gift: to make the Latin inscriptions with which Cambridge abounds come to life in a voice both witty and scholarly.

The Humanist Interpretation of Hieroglyphs in the Allegorical Studies of the Renaissance
Karl Giehlow translated by Robin Raybould

This the first English translation of Giehlow's celebrated Die Hieroglyphenkunde now recognized as the classic and pioneering statement on the origin and history of the Renaissance obsession with Egyptian hieroglyphs. The original, published in 1915 and inspired by Giehlow's discovery of a 16th century Latin manuscript of the Hieroglyphica of Horapollo illustrated by Albrecht Durer, has been described by critics as 'monumental', a 'masterpiece', 'incomparable' and 'brilliant'.

The Humm Handbook
Christopher Golis MA MBA FAICD FAIM

People drive performance, emotions drive people, temperament drives emotions. Emotional Intelligence is achieving self- and social mastery by being smart with core emotions. Self-Mastery = Awareness + Management (Steps 1 & 2 as defined by Goleman) Social Mastery = Empathy + Social Skills (Steps 3 &4 as defined by Goleman However the key to emotional intelligence is understanding your core emotions compared to your transient emotions. Your core emotions are driven by your temperament – what you are genetically born with.

Take A Punt
Geoff Robinson

Featuring more than 200 photos of punting on the River Cam. The book includes lots of photos of the Cambridge University colleges, students at the May Balls and students on the river after their exams.

Cover of The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins
Dr 'Hal' Whitehead (Christ's 1970) and Luke Rendell

Drawing on their own research as well as a scientific literature as immense as the sea-including evolutionary biology, animal behavior, ecology, anthropology, psychology, and neuroscience the authors seek to define what cetacean culture is, why it exists, and what it means for the future of whales and dolphins.

Cover of An Architect Speaks ed by David Valinsky
David Valinsky (Fitzwilliam 2003)

An Architect Speaks presents E S Prior's fascinating writings for the first time to a modern audience, together with a much wider selection of his buildings than has ever before been published. Today he is best known as the designer behind some of the most inventive and uncompromising interpretations of Ruskinian craft architecture that the English Arts and Crafts Movement produced.

Cover of Freeing the Innocent by Stephen Jakobi
Stephen Jakobi (Clare 1953)

Stephen Jakobi's riveting account of his life as a leading international human rights lawyer

Cover of The New Math by Christopher J Phillips
Christopher J Phillips (Emmanuel 2004)

An era of sweeping cultural change in America, the postwar years saw the rise of beatniks and hippies, the birth of feminism, and the release of the first video game. This book examines the rise and fall of the new math as a marker of the period's political and social ferment.

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