Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

To have your book considered for inclusion, click here to submit publication details.

best water skier in luxembourg cover
Keith Kahn-Harris (Robinson 1991)

The Best Waterskier In Luxembourg recounts sociologist Keith Kahn-Harris's encounters with those who dedicate their lives to the pursuit of excellence while almost no one else is looking. It’s a book about unsung heroes, in unsung communities, doing incredible things. It’s mostly travelogue, with a bit of sociology thrown in. It’s also a challenge he has set himself to discover worlds he knows nothing about, to search out the odd, the quirky and the eccentric but not to ridicule them.

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Andrew Hunter-Blair (Cambridge resident and local history author)

Cambridge University is one of the most well-known and iconic universities, boasting a reputation unsurpassed by few others. This new title from Andrew Hunter-Blair provides a unique insight into the workings, both past and present, of the 31 colleges that comprise Cambridge University, showcasing the college connections whilst also detailing the university’s diverse roles.

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Dr M C Mirow (Gonville & Caius 1988)

St. Augustine’s central square, the Plaza de la Constitución, is not named for the United States Constitution. Instead, its name comes from Florida’s first constitution, the Spanish Constitution of Cádiz of 1812.

Daily political life in Florida’s Spanish colonial cities was governed by this document, and cities like St. Augustine ordered their activities around the requirements, rights, and duties expressed in this Constitution. This Constitution governed Spanish Florida from 1812 to 1815 and then again from 1820 until 1821 when Spain turned Florida over to the United States.

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Jonathan Steffen (King's 1978)

Exposure brings together 40 poems written by Jonathan Steffen over a period of 30 years. It also brings these poems together with forty photographs by different photographers from around the world.

The poems in Exposure lay bare the endless range of emotions triggered by love. Some of them have previously appeared in anthologies and magazines; others are published here for the first time ever. Each poem has been matched with the original work of a contemporary photographer that illustrates some aspect of the text, providing a powerful commentary on the verse.

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Dr Mark de Rond (Fellow of Darwin College, Reader at Cambridge Judge Business School)

In this book, management scholar Mark de Rond explores the worlds of professional sports and high performance athletes as well as the latest social and psychological research to reveal counterintuitive lessons about teams. Why is it so hard to get teams to perform to their potential? How can people work more effectively together on teams? Why does conflict happen even when intentions are aligned - and is that conflict harmful, or can it actually help the group dynamic?

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Dr Mandy Swann (Homerton 1982, lecturer at the Faculty of Education), Alison Peacock, Susan Hard, Mary Jane Drummond

This book tells the story of how one primary school community worked to build a learning environment that is inclusive, humane and enabling for everybody, a place free from the damaging effects of fixed ability thinking and practices. Drawing on compelling accounts of everyday life in the school, it describes how, in just a few years, the school (once in special measures) grew into a thriving community, with distinctive views of learning, curriculum and pedagogy, monitoring and accountability that found expression in every aspect of school life.

Dr Peter Varey (Gonville and Caius 1960)

Peter Danckwerts was brilliant, witty and wise. A hero of the London Blitz, disarming parachute mines at 23, Danckwerts later turned his sharp intellect to chemical processing, studying at MIT to find out how the Americans did it. Back in the UK at Cambridge University, where he became Shell Professor of Chemical Engineering, he made an international reputation for himself as an innovator.

This biography covers his interest in wine, women and song, as well as his wide grasp of things scientific and the great sympathy and generosity he showed to his colleagues and many friends.

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Dr John Coates (King's 1982, researcher at Cambridge Neuroscience)

The laws of financial boom and bust, it turns out, have more than a little to do with male hormones. In a series of groundbreaking experiments, Dr John Coates identified a feedback loop between testosterone and success that dramatically lowers the fear of risk in men, especially younger men - significantly, the fear of risk is not reduced in women. Similarly, intense failure leads to a rise in levels of cortisol, the anti-testosterone hormone that lowers the appetite for risk across an entire spectrum of decisions.

crack scam cover
Tony Stowell (Trinity 1956)

This is a fast-paced action thriller set in an authentic background in which two ordinary people become unwittingly caught up in the harsh world of illegal drug dealing. The action is seen through the eyes of Oliver Howsen, a production engineer, and a young accountant, Emma Crawford, who by chance discover that their firm is being used to launder drug money. They, and the reader, are propelled from tranquil Cotswold life into the merciless world of illicit drugs to a final dramatic denoument.

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Tyler Beck Goodspeed (Emmanuel 2008)

While standard accounts of the 1930s debates surrounding economic thought pit John Maynard Keynes against Friedrich von Hayek in a clash of ideology, this reflexive dichotomy is in many respects superficial. It is the argument of this book that both Keynes and Hayek developed their respective theories of the business cycle within the tradition of Swedish economist Knut Wicksell, and that this shared genealogy manifested itself in significant theoretical affinities between the two supposed antagonists.

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