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The poorest girls in many Commonwealth countries spend no more than five years in school, with the global target of 12 years of quality universal education remaining “a distant reality” for many, according to a new report charting global inequality in girls’ education.
A new ‘brain training’ game designed by researchers at the University improves users’ concentration, according to new research published today. The scientists behind the venture say this could provide a welcome antidote to the daily distractions that we face in a busy world.
The strange orbits of some objects in the farthest reaches of our solar system, hypothesised by some astronomers to be shaped by an unknown ninth planet, can instead be explained by the combined gravitational force of small objects orbiting the Sun beyond Neptune, say researchers. 
Through sound and photography, Cambridge researcher Dr Elizabeth Turk shares her experiences of talking to shamanic healers in Mongolia. Over the past eight years, the social anthropologist has been exploring the increased popularity of nature-based remedies and ‘alternative’ medicine in the wake of the region's seismic politico-economic shifts of recent decades.
Cambridge researchers are using their expertise in air quality sensors to support the new Breathe London project launched by Mayor Sadiq Khan earlier this week.
The University of Cambridge has joined European partners in a major study of proteins which will shed light on the role played by biological systems in health and disease.
How we see the world around us is crucial to our understanding of it. This year's Darwin College lecture series explores this topic, asking how we define colour, how animals adapt their eyesight to survive and how we perceive visual space.
Scientists have created the most comprehensive method yet to predict a woman’s risk of breast cancer, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The study, funded by Cancer Research, is published today in Genetics in Medicine.
Recalling positive events and experiences can help protect young people against depression in later life, suggests new research published today.

"My time in Cambridge stirred in me a genuine desire to give back and encourage people, from similar backgrounds or otherwise, to believe that they can reach higher." - Kachi Ginigeme (Hughes Hall 2012)

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