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As the COP24 climate summit begins in Poland, Hugh Hunt from Cambridge's Department of Engineering outlines just what it will take to limit global warming to 1.5°C, as outlined in the 2015 Paris Agreement.  
Petri dish
The first Petri dish was put into service in 1887. Today, this most humble of scientific instruments remains at the cutting edge of discovery. Read on to find out why. 
The Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) at the University of Cambridge has joined a new alliance with the MTC (Manufacturing Technology Centre) and BRE (Building Research Establishment) to transform the way that infrastructure in the UK is designed, built, and used.

Coming from a neighbourhood where crime was high and access to higher education was poor, Alexandros Pamnani demonstrates the power of determination, which brought him to Cambridge and on to work for the European Investment Bank.

The Lost Words is a book by Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris that summons the magic of nature to help children find, love and protect the natural world.
One hundred years ago, celebrations marking the end of the First World War were cut short by the onslaught of a devastating disease: the 1918-19 influenza pandemic.
Women who experience pregnancy loss and do not go on to have children are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, such as heart disease and stroke, compared with women who have only one or two children, according to new research from the University of Cambridge and the University of North Carolina.
Researchers say that new ‘mini-placentas’ – a cellular model of the early stages of the placenta – could provide a window into early pregnancy and help transform our understanding of reproductive disorders. Details of this new research are published today in the journal Nature.
First digital map of the murders recorded by the city's Coroner in early 1300s shows Cheapside and Cornhill were homicide ‘hot spots’, and Sundays held the highest risk of violent death for medieval Londoners.
Searching through the mountains of published cancer research could be made easier for scientists, thanks to a new AI system. 

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