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An innovative joint venture launched today by the University of Cambridge and Cambridgeshire County Council is opening up new opportunities for full fibre networks to expand Cambridgeshire’s digital infrastructure.
Holly Pacey is a PhD candidate in the High Energy Physics Group based at the Cavendish Laboratory, and works on the ATLAS experiment. She spent the 2017-18 academic year working at CERN in Geneva, which operates the largest particle physics laboratory in the world. 
Chris Skidmore, Minister for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation, announced on 10 July 2019 a £30 million award to the University of Cambridge to support the new Cambridge Heart and Lung Research Institute (HLRI).
This year's Cambridge Festival of Ideas explores the theme of change, from radical action on global heating to what makes us human in an age of Artificial Intelligence.
A ‘radical’ plan by three members of the same family to boost UK growth has been named as one of the first winners of the £100,000 Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) Economics Prize, one of the world’s largest prizes in the discipline.
Patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes are at a lower risk of early death if they have a doctor who they describe as showing empathy towards them, a new study from the University of Cambridge has found.
The University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Press announced on 8 July 2019 that they have signed up to the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), a set of recommendations agreed in 2012 that seek to ensure that the quality and impact of research outputs are 'measured accurately and evaluated wisely'.
A vegetable-picking robot that uses machine learning to identify and harvest a commonplace, but challenging, agricultural crop has been developed by engineers.
Autistic adults are vulnerable to many types of negative life experience, including employment difficulties, financial hardship, domestic abuse and ‘mate-crime’, according to new research published today in the journal Autism Research.
A survey of more than 3,400 university students in the USA has found that one in five respondents reported problematic smartphone use. Female students were more likely be affected and problematic smartphone use was associated with lower grade averages, mental health problems and higher numbers of sexual partners.

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