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News

Elderly couple taking a walk through the park

UK-wide trials to begin on blood tests for diagnosing dementia

Cambridge researchers are helping lead countrywide trials to identify accurate and quick blood tests that can diagnose dementia, in a bid to improve the UK’s shocking diagnosis rate.
Professor Ioanna Sitaridou (right) with a 100 year-old Romeyka speaker in Turkey's Trabzon region.

Last chance to record archaic Greek language ‘heading for extinction’

A new data crowdsourcing platform aims to preserve the sound of Romeyka, an endangered millennia-old variety of Greek. Experts consider the language to be a linguistic goldmine and a living bridge to the ancient world.
The victorious Cambridge Men and Women’s Blue Boat crews

Cambridge do the double in 2024 Boat Race

Cambridge have done the double in the Boat Race, winning both the Men’s and Women’s races in a thrilling day of action on the Thames.
Herd of cows in a grassy field

TB vaccine may enable elimination of the disease in cattle by reducing its spread

Vaccination not only reduces the severity of TB in infected cattle, but reduces its spread in dairy herds by 89%, research finds.
Study lake in Norway

New approach to monitoring freshwater quality can identify sources of pollution, and predict their effects

Analysing the diversity of organic compounds dissolved in freshwater provides a reliable measure of ecosystem health, say scientists.
Woman holds pink breast cancer awareness ribbon.

‘Exhausted’ immune cells in healthy women could be target for breast cancer prevention

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have created the world’s largest catalogue of human breast cells, which has revealed early cell changes in healthy carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations.
People doing yoga together outdoors in Richmond USA in 2015

Reclaim ‘wellness’ from the rich and famous, and restore its political radicalism, new book argues

A new cultural history of the 1970s wellness industry offers urgent lessons for today. It reveals that in the seventies, wellness was neither narcissistic nor self-indulgent, and nor did its practice involve buying expensive, on-trend luxury products. Instead, wellness emphasised social well-being just as much as it focused on the needs of the individual. Wellness practitioners thought of self-care as a way of empowering people to prioritise their health so that they could also enhance the well-being of those around them.
Mackerel with potato salad

Fish fed to farmed salmon should be part of our diet, too, study suggests

The public are being encouraged to eat more wild fish, such as mackerel, anchovies and herring, which are often used within farmed salmon feeds. These oily fish contain essential nutrients including calcium, B12 and omega-3 but some are lost from our diets when we just eat the salmon fillet.
Professor Debbie Prentice and Professor Alan Garber

Cambridge welcomes Harvard’s Interim President

The Vice-Chancellor, Professor Debbie Prentice, welcomed Professor Alan Garber, Interim President of Harvard University, and members of his senior team during a visit to Cambridge.

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