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Aerial view of crowd connected by lines

New Cambridge-developed resources help students learn how maths can help tackle infectious diseases

Cambridge mathematicians have developed a set of resources for students and teachers that will help them understand how maths can help tackle infectious diseases.
DNA jigsaw with pieces missing

Scientists identify genes linked to DNA damage and human disease

Cambridge scientists have identified more than one hundred key genes linked to DNA damage through systematic screening of nearly 1,000 genetically modified mouse lines.
School children watching a sports game from indoors

School uniform policies linked to students getting less exercise, study finds

School uniform policies could be restricting young people from being active, particularly primary school-aged girls, new research suggests.
Robot arm and semiconductor

£11m semiconductor research centre could be key player in UK’s net zero mission

The University of Cambridge is a partner in the new £11m Innovation and Knowledge Centre (IKC) REWIRE, set to deliver pioneering semiconductor technologies and new electronic devices.
White mouse

£3 million UKRI funding to support research into better health, ageing, and wellbeing

The University of Cambridge has received UKRI funding for research on age-related biological changes in model organisms as part of a national collaboration.
A block of silica aerogel being held in a person's hand

Sensors made from ‘frozen smoke’ can detect toxic formaldehyde in homes and offices

Researchers have developed a sensor made from ‘frozen smoke’ that uses artificial intelligence techniques to detect formaldehyde in real time at concentrations as low as eight parts per billion, far beyond the sensitivity of most indoor air quality sensors.
Tents at Skytrain Ice Rice in Antarctica

Ice cores provide first documentation of rapid Antarctic ice loss in the past

Researchers from the University of Cambridge and the British Antarctic Survey have uncovered the first direct evidence that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet shrunk suddenly and dramatically at the end of the Last Ice Age, around 8,000 years ago.
Woman in purple and white floral shirt washing a carrot

Strongest evidence to date of brain’s ability to compensate for age-related cognitive decline

Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that our brains can compensate for age-related deterioration by recruiting other areas to help with brain function and maintain cognitive performance.
A partially-collapsed building in the aftermath of the Turkey-Syria earthquakes in 2023.

New report into Turkey-Syria earthquakes uncovers deficiencies in building structures and construction shortcuts were the main cause of casualties

The Earthquake Engineering Field Investigation Team (EEFIT), co-led by Professor Emily So, today publishes its findings and recommendations.
A partially-collapsed building in the aftermath of the Turkey-Syria earthquakes in 2023.

Turkey-Syria earthquakes: deficiencies in building structures and construction shortcuts were main cause of casualties

The Earthquake Engineering Field Investigation Team (EEFIT), co-led by Professor Emily So, today publishes its findings and recommendations.

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