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How do you evaluate the trustworthiness and credibility of online content that you are reading? To mark the launch of the Trust & Technology Initiative late last month, researchers across Cambridge shared their perspectives on the subject. Now, we would like to hear your thoughts about truth-claims in the digital age.

The Endangered Landscapes Programme launched by the Cambridge Conservation Initiative will provide a demonstration of nature’s powers of recovery, and the benefits to habitats, species and people of restoring biodiversity and ecosystem processes to degraded land and seas.

As the UK marks Black History Month, researchers from across the University talk about their route to Cambridge, their inspiration and their motivation.
On World Mental Health Day we look at how understanding the wiring and rewiring of the adolescent brain is helping scientists pinpoint why young people are especially vulnerable to mental health problems – and why some are resilient.
A pan-European network to tackle problematic internet usage officially launches today with the publication of its manifesto, setting out the important questions that need to be addressed by the research community.
Latest research finds significant inequalities in cuts to council services across the country, with deprived areas in the north of England and London seeing the biggest drops in local authority spending since 2010.
Cambridge Conservation Initiative (CCI) last week unveiled a programme to restore priority landscapes across Europe. The Endangered Landscapes Programme (ELP) will provide a demonstration of nature’s powers of recovery, and the benefits to habitats, species and people of restoring biodiversity and ecosystem processes to degraded land and seas. 
Researchers have used a combination of social media and transport data to predict the likelihood that a given retail business will succeed or fail. 

Alison Davies (Churchill 2010) shares her alumni story and tells us about her 'unexpected' career as a meteorologist.

A team of scientists at the University of Cambridge has developed an artificial mouse embryo-like structure capable of forming the three major axes of the body. The technique, reported today in the journal Nature, could reduce the use of mammalian embryos in research.

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