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A common insect larva that eats beeswax has been found to break down chemical bonds in the plastic used for packaging and shopping bags at uniquely high speeds. Scientists say the discovery could lead to a biotechnological approach to the polyethylene waste that chokes oceans and landfills.
The largest genomic analysis of puberty timing in men and women conducted to date has identified 389 genetic signals associated with puberty timing, four times the number that were previously known. 
Could waste material from mining be used to trap CO2 emissions? A new £8.6 million research programme will investigate the possibilities. Simon Redfern (Department of Earth Sciences) explains, in this article from The Conversation. 
Cambridge conservationists will unite with colleagues across the globe on Earth Day this Saturday to lionise environmental victories and show there is cause for hope – the decisive component in the fight to save disappearing biodiversity.
A team of scientists who a few years ago identified a major pathway that leads to brain cell death in mice, have now found two drugs that block the pathway and prevent neurodegeneration. The drugs caused minimal side effects in the mice and one is already licensed for use in humans, so is ready for clinical trials.
With inequalities set to get worse, it’s time to take radical action, says Jaideep Prabhu, Director of Centre for India & Global Business, Cambridge Judge Business School, writing for The Conversation. Could the answer lie in the ‘frugal revolution’ that is already under way? 
With inequalities set to get worse, it’s time to take radical action, says Jaideep Prabhu, Director of Centre for India & Global Business, Cambridge Judge Business School, writing for The Conversation. Could the answer lie in the ‘frugal revolution’ that is already under way? 
A faster and more accurate method of identifying which of an individual’s genes are associated with particular symptoms has been developed by a team of researchers from the UK and Saudi Arabia. This new approach could enable scientists to take advantage of recent developments in genome sequencing to improve diagnosis and potential treatment options.
Are robots capable of committing crime? Yes, says Christopher Markou, PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Law, writing for The Conversation - but what should we do if it does?

On the 2 April, the Oxford and Cambridge Club of Nigeria enjoyed coming together to cheer on the Ladies and Men the 2017 Cancer Research UK Boat Race.

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