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News

Bamboo
Modified natural materials will be an essential component of a sustainable future, but first a detailed understanding of their properties is needed. The way heat flows across bamboo cell walls has been mapped using advanced scanning thermal microscopy, providing a new understanding of how variations in thermal conductivity are linked to the bamboo’s elegant structure. The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, will guide the development of more energy-efficient and fire-safe buildings, made from natural materials, in the future. 
Discovery means simpler and cheaper manufacturing methods are actually beneficial for the material’s use in next-generation solar cells or LED lighting.
Liverwort (Pellia epiphylla)
An unprecedented insight into the diverse range of species on the British Isles will be made possible by Wellcome funding to the Darwin Tree of Life project.
Patients experiencing mild to moderate mental health issues could be managed effectively by GP practices, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. This could also help reduce the stigma faced by these individuals. However, specialist treatment may still prove more cost-effective in the long term, say the researchers.
Vidhi is a PhD candidate at the Cavendish Laboratory, a Turing Scholar, and a member of Christ’s College. Here, she tells us about growing up in Madras, her research in machine learning and leaving the world of finance for academia.

Okechukwu Nzelu (Girton 2007) discovered a passion for writing and education while at Cambridge. Today he’s a published author and teacher who is encouraging and inspiring the next generation through his work.

Ambulance
Study links the ‘weekend effect’ of increased hospital mortality to junior doctors admitting a lower proportion of healthy patients at the weekend compared to weekdays.
Cambridge Dictionary has named 'upcycling', the activity of making new items out of old or used things, as its Word of the Year 2019. 
A newly-discovered molecular mechanism that allows damaged adult liver cells to regenerate could pave the way for drugs to treat conditions such as cirrhosis or other chronic liver diseases where regeneration is impaired. 
Two Cambridge risk researchers discuss how national governments are still stuck on "old problems", and run through the things that should be keeping our leaders awake at night. 

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