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For the first time, researchers have been able to test a theory explaining the physics of how substances like sand and gravel pack together, helping them to understand more about some of the most industrially-processed materials on the planet.
When a drug fails late on in clinical trials it’s a major setback for launching new medicines. It can cost millions, even billions, of research and development funds. Now, an ‘adaptive’ approach to clinical trials and a genetic tool for predicting success are increasing the odds of picking a winner. 
Most people experience anxiety at some point in their lives, but for some it can be a crippling condition. Writing for The Conversation, Olivia Remes, a PhD candidate at the Cambridge Institute of Public Health, looks at what science tells us about beating the disorder.
Experiencing traumatic events may be associated with greater mental resilience among residents rather than causing widespread angst, suggests a study published this week that investigated the effect of World War II bombing on the mental health of citizens in German cities.
Nanotechnology is creating new opportunities for fighting disease – from delivering drugs in smart packaging to nanobots powered by the world’s tiniest engines. 
Cambridge today (23 June) begins a three-day celebration of the wonders of the brain, with talks, hands-on activities and a ‘secret cinema’ – all part of Cambridge BRAINFest 2017, a free public festival celebrating the most complex organ in the body.
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have designed antibodies that target the protein deposits in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and stop their production. 
Thirteen Cambridge academics have been recognised for their outstanding teaching in the University’s 24th Pilkington Prizes.
At a ceremony held today in Senate House, the University awarded Honorary Degrees to eight distinguished individuals in recognition of their achievements in academia, philanthropy, business and public service
Trevor Lawley and Gordon Dougan are bug hunters, albeit not the conventional kind. The bugs they collect are invisible to the naked eye. And even though we’re teeming with them, researchers are only beginning to discover how they keep us healthy – and how we could use these bugs as drugs.

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