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Bill and Weslie Janeway

American husband and wife philanthropists are to make a multi-million pound gift to the University of Cambridge to enhance the teaching and research of its prestigious Economics Faculty.

The Cambridge Animal Alphabet series celebrates Cambridge's connections with animals through literature, art, science and society. Here, E is for Elephant: an animal that takes pride of place in the Parker Library's manuscripts, is frequently in conflict with people in Thailand and parts of Africa, and is the focus of some important conservation projects.

Past research shows men find female faces more attractive at peak fertility. A new study shows an increased redness of women’s face skin at the most fertile point of ovulatory cycle, but just under the threshold for detectability, ruling out skin colouration as a driver of the attractiveness effect.

Over 5,000 miles separate Cambridge from Colombia. Yet an international event, hosted by the University of Cambridge’s Faculty of Education, may have a meaningful impact on a drawn-out peace negotiation process that aims to put an end to over fifty years of uninterrupted conflict in the South American country.

People talk about ‘data being the new oil’, a natural resource that companies need to exploit and refine. But is this really true or are we in the realm of hype? Mohamed Zaki explains that, while many companies are already benefiting from big data, it also presents some tough challenges.

The University has retained an excellence award which demonstrates its commitment to improving the working conditions and career development of research staff.

AstraZeneca and the University of Cambridge today announced three new joint schemes to support more than 80 PhD scholarships and eight clinical lectureships over the next five years spanning translational science, basic and clinical research.

At any one time over half a million people are flying far above our heads in modern aircraft. Their lives depend on the performance of the special metals used inside jet engines, where temperatures can reach over 2000˚C. Cambridge researchers will be exhibiting these remarkable materials at this year’s Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition.

A newly-identified species of spike-covered worm with legs, which lived 500 million years ago, was one of the first animals on Earth to develop armour for protection.

An ‘exhausted’ army of immune cells may not be able to fight off infection, but if its soldiers fight too hard they risk damaging the very body they are meant to be protecting, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge.

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