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News

R Derek Finlay, seen with Professor Dobson and the dedication plaque
A gift from a Cambridge alumnus will support fundamental research into the causes of disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, enabling new approaches to combat them.
CAM 80 Cover

In the Lent issue of CAM, we discover what Indian democracy can teach a world in flux, reveal how Malthus is being reinvented for our times, and investigate the truth behind why humans are so susceptible to conspiracy theories.

The media are quick to criticise humanitarian organisations as inefficient and expensive, writes Corinna Frey (Cambridge Judge Business School), in The Conversation, but we should remember the extremely challenging work they do.
If a mother picks up an infection during pregnancy, her immune system will kick into action to clear the infection – but this self-defence mechanism may also have a small influence how her child’s brain develops in the womb, in ways that are similar to how the brain develops in autism spectrum disorders. Now, an international team of researchers has shown why this may be the case, in a study using rodents to model infection during pregnancy.
New facial reconstruction of a man buried in a medieval hospital graveyard discovered underneath a Cambridge college sheds light on how ordinary poor people lived in medieval England.  

Katharine Whitehorn and third-year social scientist Lydia Woodward discuss innocence, experience and the 'Newnhamite' spirit.

Reproducibility is the idea that an experiment can be repeated by another scientist and they will get the same result. It is important to show that the claims of any experiment are true and for them to be useful for any further research. However, science appears to have an issue with reproducibility. 

Promise Knight (St Catharine's 2007) tells us about her childhood in the Nigeria and in the UK, and how Cambridge made her challenge her perceptions of herself.

Are our measures of poverty and well-being too narrow? Judith Schleicher and Bhaskar Vira from Cambridge's Conservation Research Initiative think so. Writing for The Conversation, they argue that we should include access to nature in these measures.
A study of a deal which has allowed Google DeepMind access to millions of healthcare records argues that more needs to be done to regulate such agreements between public sector bodies and private technology firms.

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