News

News

Analysis of a supposed outbreak of MRSA in a Cambridge hospital raises questions about whether the superbug can be completely eradicated, despite a national policy of zero-tolerance

A study published today has confirmed a link between antipsychotic medication and a slight, but measureable, decrease in brain volume in patients with schizophrenia. For the first time, researchers have been able to examine whether this decrease is harmful for patients’ cognitive function and symptoms, and noted that over a nine year follow-up, this decrease did not appear to have any effect.

As sea ice begins to melt back toward its late September minimum, it is being watched as never before. Scientists have put sensors on and under ice in the Beaufort Sea for an unprecedented campaign to monitor the summer melt.

New designs revealed as a public consultation is launched.

Historic recipe books and physicians’ manuals featuring home-made cures from the 17th century have gone on display to the public for the first time, as part of a new exhibition revealing the secrets of early modern household knowledge.

New study finds overall physical activity is increased by proximity to routes.

Research shows that a mother’s self-identity impacts on the amount of time her partner spends on childcare – with strong professional identity in women creating a more equal childcare balance in a couple. A father’s self-identity, however, has no bearing on a mother’s time with children.

The story of how ‘one of the last villages in London’ was saved from demolition to make way for the British Library is the subject of new research and an exhibition which opened in Bloomsbury this week.

The largest ever psychological study of sex differences in adults with autism has found that both males and females with autism on average show an extreme of the typical male mind, where systemising (the drive to look for underlying rules in a system) is stronger than empathising (the ability to recognize the thoughts and feelings of others and to respond to these with appropriate emotions).

In this article, originally posted on the CRASSH website, Graham Riach – a PhD candidate in the English Faculty working on South African literature – explores the life and legacy of writer Nadine Gordimer, who recently passed away.

Pages

Subscribe to