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News

Squeezing light
Researchers have developed a method to ‘squeeze’ visible light in order to see inside tiny memory devices. The technique will allow researchers to probe how these devices break down and how their performance can be improved for a range of applications.
Happyshield face shield
Academics, students and professional members of staff from across the University have been recognised in this year’s Vice-Chancellor’s Research Impact and Engagement Awards for their work in areas including COVID-19 testing, PPE production and online engagement.
To celebrate Black History Month 2020, an exhibition curated by Africans in STEM entitled ‘Past & Present: Black Legacies in STEM’ launches online today (5 October).
Parasitic purple indigo bird
The common cuckoo is known for its deceitful nesting behaviour – by laying eggs in the nests of other bird species, it fools host parents into rearing cuckoo chicks alongside their own. While cuckoos mimic their host’s eggs, new research has revealed that a group of parasitic finch species in Africa have evolved to mimic their host’s chicks - and with astonishing accuracy.
Crop Science Centre building
A new Centre in Cambridge, designed to fast-track technologies to sustainably improve farmers’ yields worldwide, was launched today. 
University plans to cut greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2038.
From capturing your breath to guiding biological cell movements, 3D printing of tiny, transparent conducting fibres could be used to make devices which can ‘smell, hear and touch’ – making it particularly useful for health monitoring, Internet of Things and biosensing applications.
Fibre sensor attached to face covering
From capturing your breath to guiding biological cell movements, 3D printing of tiny, transparent conducting fibres could be used to make devices which can ‘smell, hear and touch’ – making it particularly useful for health monitoring, Internet of Things and biosensing applications.
Ventilation systems in many modern office buildings, which are designed to keep temperatures comfortable and increase energy efficiency, may increase the risk of exposure to the coronavirus, particularly during the coming winter, according to research published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics.
After supporting more than 1.5 million UK schoolchildren, parents and teachers when the COVID-19 pandemic closed schools in March, mathematicians from a Cambridge University outreach programme are helping pupils get back on track now classrooms have reopened.

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