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News

Trees against blue sky
A report launched today by the British Ecological Society, with contributions from the University of Cambridge, offers the first complete assessment of the potential of nature-based solutions to mitigate climate change and benefit biodiversity in the UK. 
Tiles spelling "autism"
Autistic people have far greater risks of long term physical health conditions than others, but the reasons for this remain unclear. New research from the University of Cambridge suggests that unhealthy lifestyle habits may be an important contributing factor. 
Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence
Training the artificial intelligence models that underpin web search engines, power smart assistants and enable driverless cars, consumes megawatts of energy and generates worrying carbon dioxide emissions. But new ways of training these models are proven to be greener.  
Helping parents with depression or anxiety could also improve their ability to engage in potentially ‘protective’ forms of play with their children that can reduce the risk of behavioural problems, new research suggests.
Cambridge scientists are among the new Fellows announced today by the Royal Society.
Novel Coronavirus SARS-Cov-2
Who made more accurate predictions about the course of the COVID-19 pandemic – experts or the public? A study from the University of Cambridge has found that experts such as epidemiologists and statisticians made far more accurate predictions than the public, but both groups substantially underestimated the true extent of the pandemic.
Rejected stamp
Bank credit officers are more likely to approve loan applications earlier and later in the day, while ‘decision fatigue’ around midday is associated with defaulting to the safer option of saying no.
The University of Cambridge announces the appointment of Dr Diarmuid O’Brien as the new Chief Executive of Cambridge Enterprise, effective September 2021.
Mangrove ready to be planted
As societies face the triple challenge of avoiding the worst effects of climate change, protecting remaining biodiversity and improving human wellbeing, there are calls to end siloed thinking and design solutions that address these problems simultaneously.
CT scanning used to uncover remnants of malignancy hidden inside medieval bones provides new insight into cancer prevalence in a pre-industrial world.

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