News

News

Professor Stephen J Toope, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge
The Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stephen J Toope, this month gave evidence to The Times Education Commission, which was set up in May 2021 to examine the future of education following the COVID-19 crisis, declining social mobility, advances in technology, and the changing nature of work.
Extensive coastal development along the East Asia coastline has led to rapid declines of tidal flat ecosystems, which are the principal coastal ecosystems protecting coastal populations in China
An analysis of over a million satellite images has revealed that 4,000 square kilometres of tidal wetlands have been lost globally over twenty years.
Professor Christopher Howe, left, and Dr Paolo Bombelli, right
Researchers have used a widespread species of blue-green algae to power a microprocessor continuously for a year – and counting – using nothing but ambient light and water. Their system has potential as a reliable and renewable way to power small devices.
Hooded figure using a laptop computer
Professor Mark de Rond from Cambridge Judge Business School discusses his three years embedded with one of the UK's most prolific paedophile hunting teams, in this article for The Conversation.
Eight Cambridge University researchers are among the 60 biomedical and health scientists elected by the Academy of Medical Sciences to its Fellowship programme.
3d digital image corona virus on planet Earth in Africa
Scientists have released the first real-world data from Africa on the effectiveness of two doses of AstraZeneca/ChaAd0x-1 COVID-19 vaccination, showing that while protective against SARS-CoV-2, immunity against the Delta and Omicron variants was lower, even in the context of prior infection or infection after vaccination.
Fellowship awardees
The nine Cambridge researchers were all selected for their exceptional contributions to science.
gates cambridge
This year’s cohort comprises 79 new scholars. The scholars, who come from 30 countries, will begin their studies in October. They are studying subjects ranging from food security and bat reservoirs for viral diseases to how gut hormones control food intake and blood glucose levels. The class comprises 41 women and 38 men.
Nurse taking care of elderly sick woman in wheelchair
It’s often said that a little stress can be good for you. Now scientists have shown that the same may be true for cells, uncovering a newly-discovered mechanism that might help prevent the build-up of tangles of proteins commonly seen in dementia.
Scientists suggest that some staffing of protected areas should be considered “essential services” in future crises. 

Pages

Subscribe to