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The Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stephen J Toope, discusses the University’s forthcoming study into its historical relationship with the slave trade and other forms of coerced labour.
The smallest pixels yet created – a million times smaller than those in smartphones, made by trapping particles of light under tiny rocks of gold – could be used for new types of large-scale flexible displays, big enough to cover entire buildings.
Fiona Maine will speak about her literacy education research on wordless books and films at this year's Hay Festival.
An international group of scientists led by the University of Cambridge has finished designing the ‘brain’ of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the world’s largest radio telescope. When complete, the SKA will enable astronomers to monitor the sky in unprecedented detail and survey the entire sky much faster than any system currently in existence.
Researchers have developed a method that could drastically accelerate the search for new drugs to treat mental health disorders such as schizophrenia.
New study of FOI documents uncovers provisions that could allow the beverage giant to suppress findings from health science it funds at North American universities. Researchers argue that Coca-Cola’s contracts run counter to their public declarations of openness.
A new type of money that allows users to make decisions based on information arriving at different locations and times, and that could also protect against attacks from quantum computers, has been proposed by a researcher at the University of Cambridge.
Today sees the official launch of Myelopathy.org, a charity dedicated to one of the most common, yet under-diagnosed neurological conditions. The charity is the brainchild of Dr Mark Kotter, neurosurgeon and clinician scientist at the University of Cambridge, who works on a disorder known officially as Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy.
Tyler Shores will be speaking about how digital distraction affects our reading at this year's Hay Festival as part of the Cambridge Series.
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a new test that can reliably predict the future course of inflammatory bowel disease in individuals, transforming treatments for patients and paving the way for a personalised approach.

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