News

News

Women who experience pregnancy loss and do not go on to have children are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, such as heart disease and stroke, compared with women who have only one or two children, according to new research from the University of Cambridge and the University of North Carolina.
Researchers say that new ‘mini-placentas’ – a cellular model of the early stages of the placenta – could provide a window into early pregnancy and help transform our understanding of reproductive disorders. Details of this new research are published today in the journal Nature.
First digital map of the murders recorded by the city's Coroner in early 1300s shows Cheapside and Cornhill were homicide ‘hot spots’, and Sundays held the highest risk of violent death for medieval Londoners.
Searching through the mountains of published cancer research could be made easier for scientists, thanks to a new AI system. 
Our bodies contain two types of fat: white fat and brown fat. While white fat stores calories, brown fat burns energy and could help us lose weight. Now, scientists at the University of Cambridge have found a way of making the white fat ‘browner’ and increasing the efficiency of brown fat.
As the world around us increasingly divides into ‘us and others’, the University of Cambridge Primary School is taking part in a new research project to help children discover for themselves that far more unites us than divides us.
Latest research reveals the extent to which conspiracy theories have become “mainstream rather than marginal beliefs” across much of Europe and the US.
The variety and beauty of engineering are on display in the images featured in the Department of Engineering's annual photo competition, the winners of which were announced today. Click here to see the winners. 
CAM 85

In the Michaelmas issue of CAM we discover the dark side of Charisma, discuss student politics with past and present JCR officers and investigate the importance of the most humble of scientific instruments - the Petri dish.

A newly-published book by Churchill Archives Centre Director Allen Packwood illuminates the agonising decisions faced by the Prime Minister during some of the darkest and most uncertain moments of the Second World War.

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