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The University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Press announced on 8 July 2019 that they have signed up to the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), a set of recommendations agreed in 2012 that seek to ensure that the quality and impact of research outputs are 'measured accurately and evaluated wisely'.
A robot arm picking lettuces
A vegetable-picking robot that uses machine learning to identify and harvest a commonplace, but challenging, agricultural crop has been developed by engineers.
Autistic adults are vulnerable to many types of negative life experience, including employment difficulties, financial hardship, domestic abuse and ‘mate-crime’, according to new research published today in the journal Autism Research.
A survey of more than 3,400 university students in the USA has found that one in five respondents reported problematic smartphone use. Female students were more likely be affected and problematic smartphone use was associated with lower grade averages, mental health problems and higher numbers of sexual partners.
Josie Gaynord is a PhD candidate in the Department of Chemistry under the supervision of Professor David Spring. Her research looks at one of the biggest problems threatening global public health: antimicrobial resistance, or AMR. 
CAM 87

In the Easter term issue of CAM, we meet the friends and collaborators of comic genius Douglas Adams, discover the little-known world of single-celled organisms and investigate why playing for adults is on the rise.

The University of Cambridge voted overwhelmingly in support of changes to its student disciplinary procedure including altering the standard of proof from the criminal standard of proof to the balance of probabilities, it was announced this week.
A new study in marmoset monkeys suggests that individual variation in genes alters our ability to regulate emotions, providing new insights that could help in the development of personalised therapies to tackle anxiety and depression.
Scientists have identified mechanisms in the human brain that could help explain the phenomenon of the ‘Uncanny Valley’ – the unsettling feeling we get from robots and virtual agents that are too human-like. They have also shown that some people respond more adversely to human-like agents than others.
Dr Paulina Sliwa argues that intentions are the key to making sense of our everyday morality.

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