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Explore a selection of publications by alumni and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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Cover of Landmarks by Robert Macfarlane
Dr Robert Macfarlane (Pembroke 1994)

Landmarks presents a joyous meditation on words, landscape and the relationship between the two. This is a field guide to the literature of nature, and a glossary containing thousands of remarkable words used in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales to describe land, nature and weather.

Charles Darwin's Recipe Book Revived and Illustrated
Dusha Bateson and Weslie Janeway

Like many wives of yesterday and today, Emma Wedgwood Darwin, wife of Charles Darwin, compiled a cookery notebook revealing a lifestyle at the top of English society and intelligentsia. Although Emma's recipes are well known to scholars and researchers, Dusha Bateson and Weslie Janeway provide the general public a treasure trove of fifty-five of her recipes for the first time, each one tested by the authors for today's cook with commentary and botanical illustrations.

Glimpse
Kendra Leighton

A debut young adult novel, Glimpse is a modern ghost story inspired by a classic poem.

Liz just wants to be normal. Her life is anything but.

Seven years ago Liz lost her mother and ten years' worth of memories.  When she inherits the infamous Highwayman Inn, she hopes the move will be a fresh start.  Then she meets Zachary.  Zachary who haunts her by night and in dreams; who makes her question everything she is and wants to be; who seems scarcely real - yet makes her feel so alive.

CUWBC book cover
Jane Kingsbury (Murray Edwards, New Hall 1969) and Dr Carol Williams (Darwin 1969)

In the early 1970s, Jane Kingsbury and Carol Williams rowed for Cambridge University Women’s Boat Club (CUWBC). Now they have chronicled the development of the club through its struggle to gain recognition in women’s varsity rowing to the point where it has provided the nation with a remarkable number of international and Olympic oarswomen and will finally compete against Oxford on the Thames in London just as the men of Cambridge University Boat Club (CUBC) do.

The Scrivener
Robin Blake

The Scrivener presents a third mystery to be solved by 18th century coroner of Preston, Titus Cragg, and his friend Dr Luke Fidelis, following their previous adventures in A Dark Anatomy (2011) and Dark Waters (2012). The ingenuity of the investigators is taxed to the limit as a goldsmith's body is found in a locked room, the town's investments in the Guinea Trade go missing, and the hunt is on for a buried Civil War treasure. "Truth, Sir, that is what counts: more than punishment, more even than retribution.

Hitler's Philosophers
Yvonne Sherratt

Hitler saw himself as a 'philosopher-leader', and astonishingly gained the support of many intellectuals of his time. In this compelling book, Yvonne Sherratt explores Hitler's relationship with philosophers - those who supported his rise to power and those whose lives were wrecked by his regime.

Identity, Neoliberalism and Aspiration
Garth Stahl

In recent years there has been growing concern over the pervasive disparities in academic achievement that are highly influenced by ethnicity, class and gender. Specifically, within the neoliberal policy rhetoric, there has been concern over underachievement of working-class young males, specifically white working-class boys. The historic persistence of this pattern, and the ominous implication of these trends on the long-term life chances of white working-class boys, has led to a growing chorus that something must be done to intervene.

The Desert: Lands of Lost Borders
Michael Welland (Selwyn 1965)

Lands of extremes, contrasts, metaphor and myth, deserts cover nearly a third of our planet's land area and are home to more than half a billion people. The desert as an idea has long captured the Western imagination, but too often in ways that fail to grasp the true scope and diversity of these spaces and the realities of the lives of people for whom arid lands are home. For the outsider, stories of the desert are about the exotic, about adventures into hostile territory. Few of us consider the perspectives of those who make their livelihoods in the desert each day.

Attention Cooperation Purpose
Robert French (St Catharine's, 1967), Peter Simpson

This book describes an approach based on attention that can help individuals and groups to cooperate more effectively. It presents the first book-length reassessment of Wilfred Bion’s ideas on groups. Every group has a purpose or purposes - or, as Bion put it, “every group, however casual, meets to ‘do’ something.” The approach described here shows how individual group members’ use of attention – both broad or “evenly suspended” and focused – can promote a better understanding of purpose, making it possible for them to do what they have met to do.

Eye of the Beholder
Laura J. Snyder

The remarkable story of how an artist and a scientist in seventeenth-century Holland transformed the way we see the world.

On a summer day in 1674, in the small Dutch city of Delft, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek—a cloth salesman, local bureaucrat, and self-taught natural philosopher—gazed through a tiny lens set into a brass holder and discovered a never-before imagined world of microscopic life. At the same time, in a nearby attic, the painter Johannes Vermeer was using another optical device, a camera obscura, to experiment with light and create the most luminous pictures ever beheld.

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