Book shelf

Book shelf

  • Rounded library shelves full of books

Explore a selection of publications by alumni and academics, and books with a link to the University or Cambridge

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Deep Sahara
Leslie Croxford (Selwyn 1963)

Recovering from a nervous breakdown provoked by the death of his wife, a man takes advice from a family friend and retreats to a monastery in the deep Sahara to sketch desert insects for a book.

Upon arrival, however, he comes upon an appalling crime. Numb and exhausted, he declines a police chief’s urgent suggestion that he leave. Despite his shock, the desert seems to promise solace, a vast nullity against which he can take stock of himself and do his work.

King Billy and the Royal Road
Reginald Ajuonuma (Darwin College 1999)

King Billy and the Royal Road follows the eponymous Billy as he wakes up hungry one day and, unable to rouse his mother, decides to go out and look for food.

His trip outside becomes a journey in which he learns about the world around him, which he hasn’t been truly exposed to before, and the importance of values such as love and consideration for others.

H is for Hadeda
Alexandra Strnad (Homerton 2004)

“H Is for Hadeda is a luminous sequence of poems from a writer of great intelligence who combines elegance of expression with an excitingly visceral engagement with language. The polished surface, created by Strnad’s extraordinary dexterity and supple control of syntax and diction, belies deeper currents caused by the rift between older, Central European sensibilities and a newer, less urbane and sometimes less forgiving perspective.

The Demon in the Embers
Julia Edwards (Queens' 1995)

If you know how the Great Fire of London starts, you can stop it from happening ... can't you?

Joe Hopkins has been visiting the Tower of London when he slips through time. He finds himself in a city which is dirty, dark and chaotic.

Relieved to be welcomed once more into Lucy's home, he is horrified to find the Great Plague has killed half her family. Worse still, another great danger looms, a danger only Joe can see.

The Falconer's Quarry
Julia Edwards (Queens' 1995)

The key that unlocks Lucy's world has a dangerous power.

It's Easter Saturday, and Joe Hopkins is out riding with his brother. When his horse throws him off, he lands, quite literally, in Tudor England. Joe has learned about the Tudors at school. But if he thinks that will help him, he soon discovers that he knows both too little and too much. He doesn't realise that by giving Lucy his St. Christopher, he is putting her in danger. And when it is taken from her, he faces even greater peril to get it back.

Saving the Unicorn's Horn
Julia Edwards (Queens' 1995)

What can you do when your closest friend lives hundreds of years away?

Joe Hopkins is staying in York for October half-term. He hasn't seen Lucy since the beginning of September and he's really missing her. But when at last he slips through time again, he's alarmed to find himself in a different world altogether. This isn't Roman Britain. It's Jorvik, in the age of the Vikings.

The Leopard in the Golden Cage
Julia Edwards (Queens' 1995)

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to travel back in time?

Joe Hopkins isn't expecting to go anywhere. It's the first day of the summer holidays and he's fed up. His dad has moved out, and he doesn't know what to do with himself for the next six weeks.

Slaves for the Isabella
Julia Edwards (Queens' 1995)

What if freedom wasn't something you could take for granted? What if you had to fight for it?

If there's one thing Joe Hopkins knows better than anyone, it's that the past can be very uncomfortable. But life in wealthy Georgian Bristol seems surprisingly civilized. Lucy's house is light and airy, and there are sandwiches and tea with sugar.

He soon discovers, however, that this civility is only skin deep: Lucy's family is shockingly involved in slavery.

El resorte de la conflictividad en Bolivia: Dinámicas, riesgos y transformaciones, 2000-2008
Cinthya Nicole Jordan Prudencio (Trinity Hall 2016)

Between 2000 and 2008 in Bolivia, numerous and violent social conflicts, with deep historical roots took over the national stage. People belonging to different sectors and socioeconomic backgrounds united their protests and redirected them to complain about the government’s performance and policies. They demanded more inclusion in decision-making processes regarding the management of natural resources and the distribution of revenues.

The Stormy Present
Adam Smith (Sidney Sussex 1995)

In this engaging and nuanced political history of Northern communities in the Civil War era, Adam I. P. Smith offers a new interpretation of the familiar story of the path to war and ultimate victory. Smith looks beyond the political divisions between abolitionist Republicans and Copperhead Democrats to consider the everyday conservatism that characterized the majority of Northern voters. A sense of ongoing crisis in these Northern states created anxiety and instability, which manifested in a range of social and political tensions in individual communities.

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